Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine Program

Course Descriptions

AN5101 Spine & Extremities Anatomy - Credits 5.0
In this course, students will learn in lecture and group formats, the normal structure and function of the spine and extremities. In the first portion of this course, students will be required to demonstrate core knowledge of the gross anatomy of spinal structures, including the pediatric spine, and relevant structures of the back. Students must also demonstrate an anatomical and functional understanding of the spinal cord, its meninges and the spinal nerves. In the second portion of the course, students will explore the gross anatomical structures of the extremities and their functions. The integrated gross anatomy laboratory exercises will address related basic science issues.
Corequisite: AN5102

AN5102 Spine & Extremities Anatomy Lab - Credits 3.5
In this course, students will learn in laboratory format, the normal structure and function of the spine and extremities. In the first portion of this course, students will be required to demonstrate core knowledge of the gross anatomy of spinal structures, including the pediatric spine, and relevant structures of the back. Students must also demonstrate an anatomical and functional understanding of the spinal cord, its meninges and the spinal nerves. In the second portion of the course, students will explore the gross
anatomical structures of the extremities and their functions. The basic science component will integrate with the laboratory issues.
Corequisite: AN5101

AN5107 Histology & Embryology I - Credits 2.5
In this course, students will be introduced to histology and human developmental anatomy. In the histology portion of the course, students will study the histology of the main tissues of the body, i.e., epithelium, connective, muscle, and nervous. In addition, students will study the histology of the blood, the vascular system, bone and cartilage, the integument, and lymphoid tissue. In the developmental anatomy portion of the course, students will learn about the events of the first three weeks of development and the development of the nervous system. In coordination with the corequisite gross anatomy course, students will also study axial and limb development.
Corequisite: AN5101, AN5102, PH5103

AN5201 Head & Neck Anatomy - Credits 3.0
In this course, students will study, in lecture and group formats, the normal structure and function of the regions of the human head and neck. This includes gross anatomical structures as well as neuroanatomical structures. In addition, the embryology and histology of specific structures of the head and neck will be presented. This course is fully integrated with laboratory dissections presented in AN5202. Gross anatomy and neuroanatomy exercises will address related basic science issues.
Prerequisites: AN5101, AN5102
Corequisites: AN5202, AN5203, PH5208

AN5202 Head & Neck Anatomy Lab - Credits 2.0
In this course, students will study in laboratory format, the normal structure and function of the regions of the human head and neck. This includes gross anatomical structures as well as neuroanatomical structures. This course is fully integrated with lecture topics presented in AN5201. Gross anatomy and neuroanatomy laboratory exercises will address related basic science issues.
Corequisites: AN5201, AN5203, PH5208

AN5203 Neuroanatomy - Credits 5.5
The purpose of this course is to study the structures of the brain, spinal cord and autonomic nervous system (ANS) and their functions. The structures of the brain, spinal cord and ANS and their functions will be introduced to students through the following methods: lectures, group activities, self-directed learning, readings, and laboratory participation. The functions of these structures will be emphasized and their relevancy to clinical practice will be demonstrated through the use of patient paper cases and
problems.
Prerequisite: AN5107
Corequisites: AN5201, AN5202, PH5208

AN5304 Thorax, Abdomen & Pelvic Anatomy - Credits 2.0
Students will study, in lecture and group formats, the normal structure and function of the organ systems associated with the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Specifically, this course will cover the gross anatomy of the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and urinary systems. Laboratory exercises will help guide students toward understanding the anatomical concepts associated with these systems. In addition, students will interrelate their anatomical knowledge with the Histology and Embryology II course.
Prerequisites: AN5201, AN5202, AN5203
Corequisites: AN5305, AN5307

AN5305 Thorax, Abdomen & Pelvic Anatomy Lab - Credits 2.0
Students will study, in laboratory format, the normal structure and function of the organ systems associated with the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Specifically, this course will cover the gross anatomy of the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and urinary systems. Laboratory exercises will help guide students toward understanding the anatomical concepts associated with these systems. In addition, students will interrelate their anatomical knowledge with the Histology and Embryology II course.
Corequisites: AN5304, AN5307

AN5307 Histology & Embryology II - Credits 2.5
    In coordination with the corequisite gross anatomy course, students will learn the developmental anatomy and histology of the main systems of the chest, abdomen and pelvis in this course.
Prerequisite: AN5107
Corequisites: AN5304, AN5305

 

BC5104 Human Biochemistry - Credits 4.0
The structure and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and their reactions in metabolic pathways are investigated.
Corequisite: BC5105

BC5105 Clinical Biochemistry - Credits 1.5
An introduction to techniques used in clinical analysis of amino acids, enzymes, redox states, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein quantification, and body composition.
Corequisite: BC5104

BC5308 Nutritional Biochemistry - Credits 2.0
Vitamins and minerals will be studied with an emphasis on their biochemical involvement within human metabolic pathways and physiology. Non-essential nutrients will also be investigated with respect to their role in biochemistry and physiology.
Prerequisites: BC5104, BC5105

BU5209 Introduction to Business Principles - Credits 1.0
The purpose of this course, the first part of the comprehensive course in the Ethical Practice Management Program, is to introduce certain practical issues that students will encounter in the future to help prepare them for the rigors and realities of their chiropractic practices.
Prerequisite: None

BU6201 Principles of Marketing & Communication - Credits 2.0
The main emphasis of BU6201 addresses several areas of practice that are essential for the health care practitioner to know, understand and utilize. Concentration is on the following topics: ethically and effectively marketing and promoting a health care practice; developing effective written, verbal and electronic communication skills; addressing Risk Management issues including boundaries; and discussion of protective strategies.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

BU6306 Business Planning - Credits 2.0
This course focuses on preparing students to create a functional business plan for their future practices. Experts from the business field discuss the necessary elements and give direction to students to assist in the development of their business plans.
Prerequisite: BU6201

BU6404 Ethical Management of the Chiropractic Practice - Credits 3.0
This course is a continuation of the Ethical Practice Management Program. This course comprehensively examines and discusses many different practice topics and situations that the new doctor will shortly encounter. Also, each student will submit their business plan to a local banker who will evaluate it. The banker will then interview the student to give feedback and possibly suggest revisions to make the plan more useful to the student in their future practice. A business plan that is considered acceptable to the
banker is a requisite to begin the Clinical Internship.
Prerequisite: BU6306

BU6407 Jurisprudence & Ethics - Credits 2.0
The purpose of this course is to study the rights, privileges, duties, and obligations of the chiropractic physician in the general practice of chiropractic. Emphasis is placed on understanding liabilities, malpractice and risk management, giving testimony, report writing, and documentation. Common aspects of business law are also discussed as related to leases, licenses and advertising. Throughout the course, specific ethical issues are discussed as they relate to topics.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

CL6402 Student Clinic - Credits 11.0
Student Clinic, although designated as a laboratory in a curricular sense, marks the advent of the student's practical application of the basic and clinical sciences in a clinical setting. Students will receive close supervision, guidance and instruction in the delivery of health care by licensed clinical personnel. The patient populations evaluated and managed by the student will be confined to University students and the students' immediate family members (spouse and children). Students participating in the Student Clinic course will be expected to exhibit clinical competence and professionalism (including knowledge of and strict adherence to confidentiality and privacy policies). With the exception of the patient populations served, Student Clinic operations will closely mirror that of the University's (main) outpatient clinics, including but not limited to clinic forms, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Clinical competencies relating to skills of historical interviewing, medical record documentation, physical examination (general, regional and specialty), laboratory testing (selection, performance and interpretation), evidence based therapeutics, differential diagnoses development, ethics, professionalism, and interpersonal communication will be assessed (Competencies I-IX). Additionally, the course will assess students' knowledge on the practical application of select physical therapy modalities during designated teaching modules carried out throughout the term. Special Topic Rotations, scheduled as part of the Student Clinic experience, will serve to provide the student with additional clinical skills or enhance those skills already acquired through other educational experiences.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, Student Clinic Performance Exam, EC6303, RA6302, FR6307
Corequisites: EM6403, RA6408, RA6409

EC6303 Ambulatory Trauma Care - Credits 1.5
This course places emphasis on the practical application of emergency care procedures that can be employed in a primary care clinic setting if required. This course provides instruction in open and closed wound management techniques that encompass sterile procedures, the application methods of roller bandages, and suturing techniques. To receive a passing grade in this course, students must show current CPR certification from the American Heart Association, BLS for Health Care Providers.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM5207 Evaluation & Management of the Chest & Thoracic Spine - Credits 4.0
The primary objective of this course is for students to learn the basic concepts and skills necessary for a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) physician to evaluate and manage the chest and thoracic spine. Students will learn methods for obtaining a history specific to the chest and thoracic spine, as well as examination skills for these areas. Skills covered in the course will include, but are not limited to, taking vitals, inspection, joint and soft tissue palpation, auscultation, percussion, range of motion,
orthopedic evaluation, and basic neurological examinations. This course will teach treatments applicable to the chest and thoracic spine, such as joint and soft tissue manipulation. The clinical presentation of normal anatomy, biomechanics and physiology will be emphasized, along with an introduction to the evaluation and management of uncomplicated common conditions. This course will integrate basic concepts in (i) preventive medicine, (ii) biochemical and nutritional foundations of health, (iii) determinants of health, and (iv) lifestyle counseling involving the chest and thoracic spine. Teaching methods will include lectures, demonstrations, skills laboratories, and problem-based large group discussions that focus on skills development and clinical reasoning. This is the students' first Evaluation and Management course. It will lay the foundation for other Evaluation and Management courses by teaching concepts related to (i) the patient interview, examination and management process; (ii) joint and soft tissue evaluation and manual therapies; and (iii) the doctor-patient relationship.
Prerequisites: AN5101, AN5102
Corequisite: FH5106

EM5309 Evaluation & Management of the Abdomen, Pelvis & Lumbar Spine - Credits 4.0
The primary objective of this course is for students to learn the basic concepts and skills necessary for a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) physician to evaluate and manage the abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine. Students will learn methods for obtaining a history specific to the abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine, as well as examination skills for these areas. Skills covered in the course will include, but are not limited to, inspection, joint and soft tissue palpation, auscultation, percussion, range of motion, orthopedic evaluation, and basic neurological examinations. This course will teach treatments applicable to the abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine such as joint and soft tissue manipulation. The clinical presentation of normal anatomy, biomechanics and physiology will be emphasized, along with an introduction to the evaluation and management of uncomplicated common conditions. This course will integrate basic concepts in (i) preventive medicine, (ii) biochemical and nutritional foundations of health, (iii) determinants of health, and (iv) lifestyle counseling involving the abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine. Teaching methods will include lectures, demonstrations, skills laboratories, and problem-based large group discussions that focus on skills development and clinical reasoning.
Prerequisite: EM5207

EM5408 Evaluation & Management of the Head, Neck & Cervical Spine - Credits 4.0
The primary objective of this course is for students to learn the basic concepts and skills necessary for a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) physician to evaluate and manage the head, neck and cervical spine. Students will learn methods for obtaining a history specific to the head, neck and cervical spine, as well as examination skills for this area. Skills covered in the course will include, but are not limited to, inspection, joint and soft tissue palpation, auscultation, percussion, range of motion, orthopedic evaluation, and basic neurological examinations. This course will teach treatments applicable to the head, neck and cervical spine, such as joint and soft tissue manipulation. The clinical presentation of normal anatomy, biomechanics and physiology will be emphasized, along with an introduction to the evaluation and management of uncomplicated common conditions. This course will integrate basic concepts in (i) preventive medicine, (ii) biochemical and nutritional foundations of health, (iii) determinants of health, and (iv) lifestyle counseling involving the head, neck and cervical spine. Teaching methods will include lectures, demonstrations, skills laboratories, and problem-based large group discussions that focus on skills development and clinical reasoning.
Prerequisites: AN5201, AN5202, EM5309

EM6101 Evaluation & Management of the Extremities - Credits 4.0
The primary objective of this course is for students to learn the basic concepts and skills necessary for a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) physician to evaluate and manage the upper and lower extremities. Students will learn methods for obtaining a history specific to the extremities, as well as examination skills for this area. Skills covered in the course will include, but are not limited to, inspection, joint and soft tissue palpation, range of motion, orthopedic evaluation, and basic neurological
examinations. This course will teach treatments applicable to the extremities, such as joint and soft tissue manipulation. The clinical presentation of normal anatomy, biomechanics and physiology will be emphasized, along with an introduction to the evaluation and management of uncomplicated common conditions. This course will integrate basic concepts in (i) preventive medicine, (ii) biochemical and nutritional foundations of health, (iii) determinants of health, and (iv) lifestyle counseling involving the extremities. Teaching methods will include lectures, demonstrations, skills laboratories, and problembased
large group discussions that focus on skills development and clinical reasoning.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I
Corequisite: EM6102

EM6102 Evaluation & Management of the Musculoskeletal System - Credits 4.0
This course is designed to help students develop knowledge necessary for the diagnosis and management of selected common musculoskeletal conditions encountered in a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) setting. Content from the previous Evaluation and Management courses will be incorporated. All course content will be discussed in lecture format.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I
Corequisite: EM6101

EM6103 Evaluation & Management of the GI/GU & Reproductive Systems - Credits 4.0
This course focuses on the clinical manifestations of disorders of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and female reproductive systems. The emphasis is on the etiology, presentation, diagnostic identification, management, and prevention of system conditions. Learning is driven by class lectures, case-based learning and self-directed small group assignments. Diagnostic evaluation includes appropriate laboratory testing, special testing and imaging. Management of system disorders includes the study of clinical aspects of nutritional therapy to include diet modification, botanical medicine, manipulation, and physical therapeutics.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6104 Evaluation & Management of the Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems - Credits 3.0
This course focuses on the differential diagnosis and management of common disorders of the cardiopulmonary system. Students are expected to develop skills in history collection, physical examination, laboratory evaluation, critical thinking, and differential evaluation. In addition to history taking and the physical exam, diagnosis of these conditions will include evaluation of electrocardiograms and various laboratory tests. Students are introduced to the various modalities that are available for the treatment of these disorders. Case presentations include, but are not limited to, disorders such as myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral vascular disease, pneumoconiosis, and pneumonia. Management of these conditions will encompass the study of the clinical aspects of nutritional science including diet therapy and botanical medicine, manipulation, physiological therapeutics, and rehabilitation.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6105 Evaluation & Management of the EENT - Credits 3.0
This course focuses on the clinical manifestations of disorders of the eyes, ears, nose, and throat. The emphasis is upon the etiology, presentation, diagnostic identification, management, and prevention of these disorders. Diagnostic procedures include laboratory testing, special testing and appropriate imaging. Management of these conditions will encompass the study of the clinical aspects of nutritional science including diet therapy and botanical medicine, manipulation, physiological therapeutics, and rehabilitation. There is a portion of the course that will address complaints of dizziness and vertigo. The emphasis is upon the etiology, presentation, diagnostic identification, pathophysiology, and on the conservative management of these complaints. Learning will be driven by the class lectures, case-based presentations and self-directed small group assignments.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6106 Evaluation & Management of the Neurological System - Credits 3.0
This course presents a study of the procedures of the neurological history and examination, clinical correlation of neurological findings with other clinical data, an introduction to functional neurology, and the application of manipulation, massage, exercise, and other sensory input in the management of patients with neurological disorders. Methods of instruction include lecture, patient video presentations and clinical cases presented in a large group. Small group and self-directed learning activities outside of class include specific readings about neurological diseases/disorders and written assignments based on the readings.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6202 Physical & Laboratory Diagnosis - Credits 8.0
The primary objective of this course is for students to learn laboratory diagnostic skills, and to reinforce history taking and physical diagnostic skills taught in the Evaluation and Management courses. This course will include comprehensive instruction about the laboratory testing process, including indications, the collection and preparation of samples, the interpretation and evaluation of laboratory test results, and associated record keeping techniques. The context of this course will be a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) setting. The course will include commonly run profiles of hematology (including venipuncture skills), chemistry, urinalysis, fecal and sputum studies. This course's laboratory activities will require students to perform complete (head-to-toe) physical examinations on each other using skills that are introduced and reinforced in the course. Male and female sensitive examinations will be performed on
simulation technology models.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, EM6101, EM6102, EM6103, EM6104, EM6105, EM6106

EM6207 Pediatrics, Geriatrics & Female Health Issues - Credits 3.0
This course focuses on the differential diagnosis and management of common conditions that present in the pediatric and elderly populations. Patient presentation, identification, prevention, and management are addressed in lectures and large group experiences. Learning is driven by clinical cases and enhanced by the lectures. Management of these conditions includes the study of the clinical aspects of nutritional science (including diet therapy and botanical medicine), manipulation, physiological therapeutic, and rehabilitation.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6210 The Clinical Encounter - Credits 0.5
This course focuses on the practical issues of patient management in the clinical encounter and the relationship of doctor-patient interactions to health care outcomes. Students will explore the literature to broaden their understanding of the issues in the field of patient management. Students will be required to reflect on and actively develop their personal communication skills with patients.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6304 Advanced Diagnosis & Problem Solving - Credits 2.0
The primary objective of this course is to give students an opportunity to master the diagnostic skills, and the associated psychomotor skills used in a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) setting. The laboratory portion of this course will use simulated patients to help students synthesize and refine their history taking, examination and diagnostic skills. Emphasis will be placed on the doctor-patient relationship, including appropriate ethical boundaries and effective communication skills. Students will also practice record keeping skills, including the preparation of SOAP notes. This course will require students to perform male and female sensitive exams (breast and pelvic) on standardized patients.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, EM6202

EM6305 Psychopathology & Health Psychology - Credits 3.0
This course includes:
(i) review and discussion of the major topics in health psychology including examination of the relationships of psychopathology, lifestyle and personal relationships to physical health. Topics include risk factors and treatments for physical disorders such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and chronic pain as well as the exploration of the comorbidity of physical and psychological disorders.
(ii) an examination of diagnoses across the basic categories of psychopathology (depression, anxiety, somatoform, substance use disorders, sleep disorders, eating disorders, sexual dysfunction, cognitive disorders, and psychosis) with emphasis on etiology, screening, diagnosis, and management in a primary care setting. Students are asked to review current theories and their implication for practice.

There are three hours of lecture presentation per week on the topics of psychopathology and health psychology. Self-directed learning is organized around additional material available through the course website and may include cases, articles, on-line presentations, etc.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

EM6403 Clinical Natural Medicine - Credits 2.0
The primary objective of this course is to give students an opportunity to synthesize and apply the basic and clinical science knowledge they have encountered through a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) framework. Students will apply a comprehensive skill set, including mechano-biology, manual therapies, nutritional aspects of care, functional rehabilitation, and exercise prescription, and the application of physiological, biochemical and pharmacological therapeutic modalities, through case reviews and application of current research and findings. Students will be presented with a variety of case studies and will derive appropriate diagnoses and treatment plans. Students will then justify their treatment plans and protocols in terms of basic and clinical science concepts as well as emerging research in an oral presentation. Patient management within the whole health oriented paradigm will be emphasized as well as the use of emerging theories and research in clinical practice. This course will be presented through a combination of lecture and online sessions. Group work will be emphasized in this course.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, EM6304, FR6309, MM6209, FR6307, NN6206, NN6301, NN6308
Corequisite: CL6402

EM6405 Doctor - Patient Relationship - Credits 2.0
This course focuses on the practical issues of patient management in practice. Students are asked to explore the literature to broaden their understanding of the issues in the field and then reflect on and actively develop strategies for their relationships with patients and other health care providers. Lecture and discussion topics include: structures in doctor-patient interaction; models of the doctor-patient interaction; doctorpatient boundaries; the impact of the doctor-patient relationship on health care outcomes; the impact of the doctor-patient relationship on patient satisfaction; culturally-responsive health care; the sociological context of patient suffering; co-creation of the patient's story in a therapeutic relationship; death, dying and palliative health care; management of the abused patient; and the doctor's responsibilities to the community and society. Class time is used to explore doctor/relationship issues through lectures, cases, guest presentations, structured interpersonal exercises, article reviews, and discussion.
Prerequisite: EM6210

EM6406 Dermatology - Credits 1.0
This course is designed to help students develop necessary knowledge for the diagnosis and management of common diseases of the skin encountered in a broad-based conservative care (primary health care) setting. All course content will be discussed in a lecture format.
Prerequisite: EM6202

EP5401 Evidence Based Practice: Critical Appraisal of the Biomedical Literature - Credits 1.0
The focus of this course is research literacy, appraisal of clinical research studies, and the application of the best research evidence to patient care and clinical practice. Students will sharpen their skills recognizing and developing both the research hypothesis and patient-centered clinical questions as well as searching the highest quality and most significant clinical and basic science literature and databases, including
complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) specific databases. Students will learn to appraise and analyze the research studies and evaluate the evidence before deciding to apply the best evidence to patient and health care issues. Students will learn to effectively communicate literature reviews, analyses and conclusions in written, oral and electronic formats to patients, peers and professionals. Students will develop the skills for effective and efficient information management, research literacy and evidence based practice (EBP) habits to accelerate learning and expand basic and clinical science knowledge.
Prerequisite: MI5205

EP6401 Evidence Based Practice: Applied Evidence Based Practice - Credits 1.0
Building on skills learned, this course emphasizes the professional application of evidence based practice (EBP). Applied EBP is emphasized, including questioning, researching, analyzing, and communicating clinically relevant information. Focusing on clinically relevant topics such as headache, neck, thoracic, and low back pain, as well as non-musculoskeletal problems such as asthma, hypertension, etc., students will form appropriate clinical questions and search the research and clinical literature, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) databases using limits, MeSH terms, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate the skills to analyze and evaluate the literature, and determine the clinical value and relevance of the evidence. The course will also focus on communication: the presentation of the evidence, analysis, evaluation, and conclusion in written, oral and electronic formats to peers, professionals and patients. Students will develop clinical reasoning, critical thinking, creativity, resourcefulness, and coping skills, using an evidence based practice approach to professional development and continuing education. CAM professionals will present applied EBP content as guest lecturers at various times during the term.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I
Corequisite: EM6304 (or prior successful completion)

EP7101 Evidence Based Practice: Journal Club - Credits 0.5
This class is an interactive course designed to sharpen students' research literacy and evidence based practice (EBP) skills. Applied EBP is emphasized, including questioning, researching, analyzing, and communicating clinically relevant information. The overall objective of this course is to create sound EBP habits in students preparing to become physicians. Students will research, develop and present a journal of clinically relevant, important and applicable research literature to a small group of peers and practicing clinical mentors and professionals, using key evidence based practice skills (asking, accessing, appraising, applying, and assessing) along with the concepts of critical appraisal of the literature. Emphasis is placed on how the research and clinical literature impacts clinical decisions.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase II

FH5106 Fundamentals of Natural Medicine & Historical Perspectives - Credits 3.0
Students are introduced to the historical perspective of the common principles and origins on which natural medicine concepts were founded and developed with emphasis on chiropractic and naturopathic medicine. The concepts of the science of manual therapy and its effect on tissue physiology, neurological processes and psychophysiological aspects are introduced. The whole health concept of patient care will be introduced in this course. This course will also introduce concepts of personal and collective duties of professionalism, ethics and self-reflection that must be developed by future physicians.
Prerequisite: None

FH5310 Whole Health Concepts & Philosophical Perspectives - Credits 1.0
This course will expand on the whole health concepts that were first introduced in the Fundamentals of Natural Medicine course. Concepts to be explored will include, but are not limited to: the dynamic interrelationship between various body systems in both normal and pathological states; the impact of external factors on various body systems, such as environmental, life style, nutritional, physical fitness, psychosocial, and stress; integrating whole health concepts into everyday life and patient care. Logical analysis of the principles underlying philosophical perspectives will also be discussed.
Prerequisite: FH5106

FR6204 Functional Rehabilitation - Exercise Prescription - Credits 3.0
The primary goal of the course is for students to develop an understanding of concepts and techniques used in functional rehabilitation and exercise prescription. Concepts and techniques will include functional movement patterns and gait analysis, functional goal setting, functional stabilization, functional reactivation/rehabilitation, and cognitive-behavioral education. These concepts and techniques can be applied to primary and secondary injury prevention, overall fitness, chronic pain management, and performance enhancement. This class will emphasize low-tech tools and active care procedures and will integrate previously taught manual therapies such as joint and soft tissue manipulation. Course content will be presented in lecture and lab settings utilizing a variety of active learning methodologies.
Prerequisites: EM6101, EM6102

FR6307 Physiological Therapeutics - Modalities - Credits 4.5
This course introduces therapeutic modalities and their practical application in the clinical setting. Therapies include actinotherapy, thermotherapy, hydrotherapy, cryotherapy, mechanotherapy, and various electrostimulation modalities.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

FR6309 Functional Rehabilitation - Advanced Manual Medicine - Credits 3.0
The primary objective of this course is for students to learn advanced concepts and techniques relating to the treatment of neuromusculoskeletal conditions. A variety of concepts and techniques will be taught relating to, among other things, (i) manual and low-tech soft-tissue therapy and manipulation, (ii) functional taping, (iii) joint mobilization, (iv) neuromobilization, and (v) sensory motor stimulation methods. Course content will be presented in both a lecture and lab setting.
Prerequisite: FR6204

GE5404 Medical Genomics - Credits 2.0
The first half of this course is focused on the underlying basic sciences concepts required to understand the human genome (biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology), and students will be introduced to the biotechnology utilized for genetic analysis. The second half of the course will focus on the clinical, ethical, legal, and psychosocial aspects of medical genomics.
Prerequisite: PA5204

IC7102 Clinic Internship I - Credits 17.0
Students will further develop skills needed for successful management of patients and their conditions. Students will participate in off-campus rotations to expand their experience and knowledge base. All students will be evaluated for skill development, adjustive technique and case management. Students must provide a written case narrative on 10 cases that they have managed or co-managed in the clinics. Students will participate in Quality Assurance activities to ensure that the patient chart is in compliance with the university's Quality Assurance program. In-service training will be given in personnel issues for the practice, OSHA compliance issues for the private practice office, provisional credentialing of the chiropractic intern, and Medicare issues for the private practice.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase II, CL6402, American Heart Association BLS for Health Care Professionals with AED CPR certification
Corequisites: Completion of the Phase II Exam and Phase III Performance Exams

IC7201 Clinic Internship II - Credits 17.0
Students enter the senior intern phase of training. Skill development and evaluation continues. Students will participate in the development of junior interns and begin advanced technique electives. Students will explore off-campus observations and assignments to expand their knowledge base and obtain exposure to private practice via mentoring with a licensed field doctor. In-service training will consist of advanced
diagnostic procedures such as EMG, MRI, ultrasonography, etc. There will be a continuation of rehabilitation training and advanced treatment techniques to help refine the skill levels of the intern prior to graduation. Business office rotations and insurance submission experience is offered.
Prerequisites: IC7102, American Heart Association BLS for Health Care Professionals with AED CPR certification, Completion of the Phase II Exam and Phase III Performance Exams
Corequisite: Case Defense

MI5205 Fundamentals of Public Health - Credits 3.0
The focus of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of public health, health promotion and disease prevention. Individual, environmental and sociodemographic factors affecting the population's health will be discussed, along with organization of the public health system, health surveys, health policies, and health screening. Research literacy will also be a major focus in this course including searching quality databases, developing effective search strategies, recognizing various study designs, and determining the best evidence that supports various public health and health care topics.
Prerequisite: None

MI5303 Medical Microbiology I - Credits 4.5
Considered in this course are the infections affecting the nervous system, upper respiratory system, blood and lymphatic system, skeletal system, and integumentary system. The discussion would include microbiologic characteristics, epidemiology, clinical aspects, treatment and prevention of various pathogens where appropriate public health aspects of these infections would be elaborated upon. In addition, basic and clinical immunology including immunologic disorders will be discussed in detail. All the content will be discussed in lecture, group and case-based format.
Prerequisite: MI5205

MI5403 Medical Microbiology II - Credits 5.0
Considered in this course are the infections affecting the respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and urinary systems. The discussion will include microbiologic characteristics, epidemiology, clinical aspects, treatment, and prevention of various pathogens. Where appropriate, public health aspects of these infections will be elaborated upon. All the content will be discussed in lecture, group and
case-based format.
Prerequisite: MI5303

MM6208 Orthopedic Musculoskeletal Imaging - Credits 1.0
This course will consider the practical application of imaging the orthopedic patient. The course will concentrate on the most common advanced imaging modalities currently used in private practice, relating them to various orthopedic conditions encountered in private practice. The course will review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and treatment of various orthopedic conditions, and place a strong emphasis on the imaging required to evaluate these conditions, assess severity and monitor treatment or provide appropriate referral, when required.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, EM6101, EM6102

MM6209 Advanced Manual Therapy Techniques I - Credits 2.0
This course is designed to allow the student to refine their skills in all avenues of manual therapy techniques. Topics will include examination and treatment with manipulation of the entire appendicular and axial skeleton. Also included in this course will be flexion-distraction techniques, blocking techniques and instrument-aided adjustive techniques.
Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, EM6101

MM6310 Advanced Manual Therapy Techniques II - Credits 0.5
This laboratory course is a condition-based course on the manual therapy management of the conditions in the cervical, thoracic, lumbar spine, and upper and lower extremities. Additional conditions encountered in chiropractic practice such as colic, restless leg syndrome, TMJ syndrome, otitis media, and essential hypertension will also be included.
Prerequisite: MM6209

MM6311 Comparative Techniques & Listing Systems - Credits 1.0
This course will explore the various listing systems for a functional articular lesion in the application of manual therapies. It will also allow students to communicate with other doctors that utilize listing systems. Scientific and philosophical principles will be employed to illustrate the validity of the various listing systems. Discussions of the rationale of continued use of listing systems will also be discussed.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

NN5406 Science of Diet & Nutrition - Credits 3.0
This course provides a basic understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition and stresses the essentials of the basis for good nutritional status. It serves as the basic nutrition course that follows the basic science presentation of the macronutrients and the micronutrients presented in the Nutritional Biochemistry course (BC5308). Topics presented in this course include a review of the macronutrients and micronutrients with emphasis on the health properties of each as well as the severe deficiency states for both micronutrients and macronutrients. Digestion, absorption and transport of the nutrients, and consequences of malabsorption care are covered. Energy production, energy balance and weight management are also described. Food habits in the United States and nutrition across the life cycle are discussed in the course. Male and female health, sports and exercise nutrition, enteral and parenteral nutrition procedures as well as an introduction to the science of food preparation and handling are included. An introduction to nutritional status assessment using food frequency questionnaires and diet history is given.
Prerequisite: BC5308

NN6107 Pharmacology I - Credits 3.0
This course provides a basic understanding of the use of drugs in western medicine for the treatment of disease. Topics covered in this course will be descriptions of drug names and classification, general principles of drug action and metabolism that will cover the area of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Factors influencing drug action and a discussion of drug safety are addressed. A large part of this course will be a description of the drug actions on body systems including all the major organ systems and the disorders and diseases in each of the systems. Included will be a description of
the mechanism of action, major untoward effects and contraindications for each drug and drug category. Interactions with other drugs and botanicals as well as a description of the nutrients that are depleted by each of the drugs will be covered. Drug actions on infection and immune system regulation as well as chemical dependency and substance abuse will be described. A discussion of poisons and their antidotes is included.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

NN6108 Botanical Medicine I - Credits 3.0
This course presents the fundamentals of herbal science and pharmacognosy. Topics included are herbal terminology, principles of herbal pharmacology and treatment, as well as mechanisms for optimizing safety. Dosage forms and preparations and standardization are covered in detail. Extraction and purification of the active ingredients are explained in the course. Herbal approaches to maintenance of health and treatment of disease as well as the strengthening of organ systems are presented for all the major organ systems of the body and many of the primary care diseases found in each of those organ systems. A major focus in the second half of this course is a description of the Materia Medica for 30 of the common botanical medicines used in western medicine. Active ingredient, part of the plant used, major therapeutic use, untoward effects, contraindications and interactions with drugs, and other botanical medicines are covered
in detail.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

NN6206 Pharmacology II - Credits 3.0
The Pharmacology II course will encompass a discussion of first and second level drugs for the common disorders of each organ system and the art of prescribing these medications. The course addresses the development of medical protocols for the patient by the physician using current pharmaceutical agents for the prevention and treatment of disease. Included in the course are discussions of treatment duration as well as dosages and side effects of common drugs. Differences in individual reactions according to CyP450 typology and idiopathic reactions to drugs are stressed. The administration of the drugs including the effects of enteral and parenteral administration as well as depot and subcutaneous routes will be discussed. Drug-drug, drug-herb and drug-nutrient as well as drug-food interactions and nutrient depletion by drugs will be addressed. Students will be given the opportunity to develop an appropriate course of treatment for the drugs most often prescribed in the United States. Students will be given case studies and will be expected to develop appropriate protocols and specific medications for patients across the life cycle. Students will be given a description of the scope of license regarding medications of legend and over-the-counter drugs.
Prerequisite: NN6107

NN6301 Clinical Nutrition Credits - 4.0
This course offers a nutritional approach to the prevention and treatment of disease, with an emphasis on maintenance of health and homeostasis and specific disease conditions and their prevention. Nutritional assessment methods are covered in detail and the methods for obtaining a physical exam of nutrition health and means to assess nutritional status are covered. A description of the approach to nutrition counseling and the nutrition counseling session are described. Topics covered are food frequency questionnaires (FFQ), health history and physical exam forms, and food diary and intake forms. The diseases of the major organ systems in the body are covered with the musculoskeletal, joint health, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems covered in depth. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and thyroid diseases are also described. Liver detoxification, adrenal stress syndrome and a functional medicine approach to the liver, adrenal, thyroid, and gastrointestinal tract are described. Other diseases covered are central nervous system disease and infectious and dermatological conditions. A discussion of immune up-regulation, glandular products, chelation therapy, and glyconutrients is held. The use of all nutritional therapies, botanical medicines and other functional medicine approaches to maintenance of health and prevention and treatment of disease are described.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

NN6308 Botanical Medicine II - Credits 4.0
This advanced course will engage the subject of therapeutic herbalism in great detail. The strategies for addressing dysfunction in the organ systems will be outlined. Specific aspects of botanicals will be studied including: constituents, pharmacognosy, specific indications, contraindications, toxicity, and dosing parameters. In the traditional manner, the herbs will be studied according to therapeutic category (nervines, hepatics, anodynes, etc). Close attention will be paid to the potential for herb-herb and herb-drug interaction. Students will practice compounding and dispensing as part of their clinical rotations, but
this course will provide the theoretical information to enable them to do so.
Prerequisite: NN6108

PA5204 Fundamentals of Pathology - Credits 3.0
This course provides an introduction to the basic changes in the morphology of the cells, tissues and organs in diseased states. Extensive use of visual aids with the latest computer technology helps students to differentiate abnormal from normal, and to correlate the clinical aspects of the alterations. Included also is discussion on general characteristics, classification and differential diagnosis of cysts, benign and malignant tumors and other neoplastic entities. All content will be discussed in lecture and group activity/discussion format.
Prerequisites: AN5107, PH5103

PA5302 Systems Pathology I - Credits 4.0
Considered in this course are the pathologies peculiar to and characteristic of the various systems of the body. The systems examined are the nervous system, myopathy, neuropathy, bone and joint pathology, immunopathology, hematopathology, and dermatopathology. Each condition is studied from the standpoint of general characteristics, gross and microscopic appearance and clinical course.
Prerequisite: PA5204
Corequisites: AN5304, AN5305, AN5307

PA5402 Systems Pathology II - Credits 6.0
Considered in this course are the pathologies peculiar to and characteristic of various systems of the body. The systems examined are respiratory, cardiovascular, reproductive and mammary, gastrointestinal (inclusive of liver, gall bladder and pancreas), urinary, and endocrine.
Prerequisite: PA5302

PH5103 Cellular Physiology & Hematology - Credits 4.0
In this course, students will review, in a problem-based setting, some of the basic science concepts related to the physiology of cellular membranes and organelles, along with the integrated functioning of the blood as a tissue. The physiology laboratory related basic science issues of diffusion, osmosis, membrane transport, etc.
Corequisite: AN5107

PH5208 Neurophysiology - Credits 3.5
The purpose of this course is to study the neurophysiology of the nervous system. The complex signals created and utilized by the nervous system to control most bodily functions will be studied in depth to gain a better understanding of how the human nervous system functions. Areas of study will include: synaptic transmission; autonomic control; sensory systems including the special senses of vision, hearing, touch, balance (vestibular function), taste and smell; signal integration in the CNS; control of the motor system (including skeletal muscle physiology); and higher cortical functions such as speech, sleep and associational areas of the brain.
Prerequisite: PH5103
Corequisites: AN5201, AN5202, AN5203

PH5306 Neuroendocrinology, GI & Reproductive Physiology - Credits 4.0
This course will address neuroendocrine mechanisms that operate to maintain homeostatic control over various systems and states within the body. The primary focus will be upon the normal mechanisms and reflexes that operate to maintain a healthy state. Specific topics will include regulation of the reproductive, gastrointestinal and thermoregulatory systems. Neuroendocrine feedback pathways that regulate metabolic and mineral homeostasis will also be discussed. Course instruction will be through lecture and group discussion of selected problems and cases.
Prerequisite: PH5208

PH5405 Cardiovascular, Respiratory & Renal Physiology - Credits 5.0
This course will present the normal physiologic function of the respiratory system (breathing, ventilation and gas exchange), circulatory system (blood pressure, cardiac output, pressure and flow homeostasis, and cardiac electrophysiology), and the kidney (conservation and excretion, and volume homeostasis). Content will be presented through lecture, laboratory, and supplemental problem exercises. Structure-function relationships and mechanisms of regulation will be emphasized. Laboratory based measurements on human subjects will be used along with computer simulations to demonstrate and illustrate core concepts. Supplemental problem exercises will provide students the opportunity to demonstrate and test their understanding and capability to apply core concepts toward explanative assessment of how each of these systems function.
Prerequisites: AN5304, AN5305, PH5306

RA5206 Normal Radiographic Anatomy & Variants - Credits 1.5
Chiropractic physicians must have a thorough understanding of the normal radiographic anatomy of the skeletal system if they are to detect abnormal pathology in these regions. This course provides background information as a basis for courses in musculoskeletal imaging diagnosis, essentially designed to help students differentiate a normal structure from pathology. The study of normal variants and anomalies of the skeletal system and skeletal measurement procedures are presented to give students an overall understanding of variations of normal, which both mimic pathology and often present with unique clinical challenges.
Prerequisites: AN5101, AN5102

RA5407 Radiation Physics & Technology - Credits 1.0
This course explains the basics of X-ray production, interaction with matter, image production, and patient protection. Emphasis is on troubleshooting common technical errors that create artifacts and poor diagnostic image quality. Radiation biology is also presented to provide the student with a healthy respect for the intrinsic dangers of ionizing radiation and the principle of quality films at the lowest possible exposure.
Prerequisite: RA5206

RA6203 Fundamentals of Imaging: Arthritides & Trauma - Credits 2.5
Arthritic disorders and associated connective tissue disorders are discussed including distinctive radiographic characteristics and associated clinical presentations of the basic categories of joint disease. Traumatic conditions are presented with special emphasis on the musculoskeletal system, both spine and extremity. Laboratory exercises reinforce and apply core material.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

RA6205 Fundamentals of Imaging: Tumors - Credits 2.5
A systematic and orderly approach to interpretation of plain film radiography is stressed, complemented by associated findings relative to special imaging modalities. Clinical correlation of anomalies, bone pathology, joint abnormalities, and soft tissue changes are presented. Laboratory sessions focus upon the development of skills necessary for the acquisition of patient information, and the interpretation of X-rays pertaining to bone pathology. Furthermore, laboratory sessions afford students the opportunity to study actual case studies, including clinical presentations and imaging of material presented during lecture.
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I

RA6302 Fundamentals of Imaging: Chest & Abdomen - Credits 2.5
A systematic and orderly approach to interpretation of plain film radiography is stressed, complemented by associated findings relative to special imaging modalities. Normal radiographic anatomy, anomalies and pathology of the chest and abdomen are presented with associated clinical presentations. Laboratory sessions focus upon the development of skills necessary for the acquisition of patient information, and the
interpretation of X-rays pertaining to pathology of the chest and abdomen. Furthermore, laboratory sessions afford students the opportunity to study actual case studies, including clinical presentations and imaging of material presented during lecture.
Prerequisites: RA6203, RA6205

RA6408 Report Writing & Advanced Imaging - Credits 1.0
This course teaches the basics of writing a detailed and accurate radiology report emphasizing findings, impressions and recommendations. The reports are written on a variety of normal and abnormal cases exposing the student to a variety of pathologic processes. The advanced imaging portion of this course focuses on the different types of advanced imaging, their uses and limitations as well as clinical decision-making regarding proper indications to order advanced imaging.
Corequisite: CL6402

RA6409 Radiographic Positioning & Radiology Management - Credits 2.0
This course considers the practical parameters of X-ray technology including patient positioning, technique calculations, instrument operation, film processing, and other pertinent phases of technology. Students gain experience in the practical application of routine radiographic procedures via the use of energized and non-energized units and lab partners. The positioning portion of this class/lab focuses on radiography of the spine, extremities, abdomen, and chest. Additionally, this course presents guidelines for the design of an office X-ray facility, selection of equipment, and quality control that is needed to maintain optimum image formation. State and federal regulations governing these installations, the medico-legal aspects of diagnostic radiology, ethics, and record keeping are emphasized.
Corequisite: CL6402

Events