Archive for tag: culture

Put Those Hands Together When You Pray

If you don't pray, put them together anyway. In the age of anything goes, I've taken to the lazy practice of praying silently in my head while lying in bed at night. I don't know where my hands are exactly, but they sure aren't folded nicely in front of my chest like the iconic prayer image of the olden days.

Who cares? Why bother pressing your hands together and holding them in that fairly awkward position that drove me nuts as a Catholic school kid? I'll be the first to admit that I let my fingers fall and intertwine into the sloppy prayer paws pose as soon as the priest looked the other direction.

Now I realize I was screwing myself out of some real benefits. Sure, God was probably disappointed in my faulty direction following, but I'm not focusing on the spiritual deficit here. I'm focusing on the physical and even the psychological benefits I -- and many other lazy prayers -- had been missing out on all my young life.

This whole conversation hinges on one important point -- an acupuncture point -- called Pericardium 6, or "PC6" as we call it, because again we're all too lazy to stick to the formalities in life. What does PC6 have to do with prayer paws (as my kids call them)? This now famous spot, two inches proximal to the inner wrist crease, has been dubbed the most researched acupoints of the modern day. You know those "anti-nausea" motion-sickness type bracelet bands, with the ball that presses into the inner wrist? That thing's stimulating good ole PC6.

Why is PC6 such a beneficial acupoint? Our trusty guide to acupuncture points and meridians and their energetic functions is a beefy, rust-colored book usually referred to by its author's last name, "Deadman." What does Deadman say about PC6? Oh, nothing too exciting. Just that it treats all diseases of the chest, particularly the heart, but also benefits the lungs, too. It can be used for heart surgery analgesia. What? Yes! No anesthesia necessary...just squeeze PC6 for me while I go under the knife!

In TCM terms, PC6 "unbinds the chest and regulates qi," "regulates the heart and calms the spirit," "harmonizes the stomach to relieve nausea," and "clears heat." It's indicated in conditions such as heart pain, palpitations, cough, asthma, insomnia, anxiety, abdominal masses, fevers, malaria, irregular menstruation, and swellings in the armpits. Nothing important there, right? Not! PC6 does just about everything you could want an acupoint to do.

During a recent advanced seminar class with Dr. Robin Fan, we discussed the benefit of stretching the Kidney meridian in cases of heel pain. Suddenly, all I could picture was the traditional prayer pose--hands out front, pressed gently together, stretching and stimulating the bulk of the Pericardium meridian!

It makes sense. What is the function of prayer if not to calm the mind and spirit? It's not just Catholics and other Christians who have always used this prayer pose, either. As my mind wandered -- sorry, Dr. Fan -- around the globe, I saw the Chinese practicing qi gong poses, the Indians practicing yoga poses, etc. Every tradition I could think of involved some use of this position.

In anthropology, when we see similar customs or values amongst a variety of cultural groups around the world, we call those core elements "cultural universals." In other words, everybody's doing it. Why? The answer is one that, despite my need to create an evidence-based practice, I've always secretly promulgated; sometimes, you don't need to sit around waiting for a formal research study to prove a truth. It's lovely that western medicine has put together some studies that do show the efficacy of PC6 in some conditions, but I'm not waiting for them to prove the rest. I'm going with Deadman and the ancient world traditions on this one.

Pray on, prayers!

Why Are We So Wimpy?

2014-06-10_wimpYes, I said "we." I'm lumping you all in with me and almost everyone else I know. We're wimpy. My sister said it best several years ago in a comment about the "wussification of America." No, I'm not sure how to spell that. She was speaking about the general wussiness of people these days, and I'll see that new word and raise it to another contextual use.

I'm sure you know what I'm talking about. If you have had a baby in the past 10 years, you've certainly had to explain to a grandmother (your kid's or otherwise) why baby has to ride in the car seat for every little trip. "Yes, grandma, I know we're just riding up the street to the corner store. Yes, she still needs to be strapped into her car seat. Just because." Grandma undoubtedly replies, "I never strapped your father into a car seat, and he lived. He would ride all the way to Florida to visit Aunt Ida every year and nothing ever happened to him." Then simply to justify my own wussiness, I make up something about how I'll be arrested if the police see me with my kid riding on my lap.

2014-06-10_signSome of you might not be convinced about the car seats. They're important. Even I strap my kids into those things just to ride up the street, and I don't consider myself a huge wussy. Just start extrapolating this theory, though, and you'll surely jump onto the "wussification of America" bandwagon. We all drink light beer. Every kid gets a trophy. They cancel school when it snows. I'm so hot walking the 10 feet from my air-conditioned car to my air-conditioned office. I have to wait 3 whole seconds for my Facebook page to load on this old phone. Waaaah.

How does this relate to Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine? Well, the wimps don't leave their wimpiness at the door of the clinic. That is for sure. I can write this post without fear of offending anyone, because I, myself, am a needle wuss. That's right. I don't want to feel the needles. I'll needle you, but don't you try to needle me.

Clearly I am not alone. Sure, you have a few patients who never flinch when you insert a needle. They never complain that something hurts or feels weird. These are the lovely "exception" patients, and they are few and far between. Most of us recoil in pain -- pain that is really just an unfulfilled apprehension of pain -- with the insertion of each needle. At first, I liked seeing this reaction from patients, because it justified my own wimpiness. Now, though, I've evolved. As I become less wimpy about needling myself and letting others needle me, I think I subconsciously expect more of my patients, too.

2014-06-10_smokeThe people in Nicaragua never flinched. We would jab those needles right into the sore back or the tired feet, and the patient would hardly notice. Are Nicaraguans simply a stronger people than Americans? Probably, but I didn't stop there. No, what about the Chinese needling? So deep, so hard, so scary for most Americans. Are they inherently stronger than us, too? They want to feel that moxa until it burns a blackened memorial into ST36. I would move to Japan, home of "shallow needling," to avoid those 6-inch needles I've been told so much about from the Chinese professors and clinicians.

2014-06-10_needleNo, I don't think it's that Nicaraguans are freakishly strong or that Chinese people are particularly masochistic. I just think Americans are caught in the throes of the recent trends towards wussification. Be careful, don't get hurt; don't let the sunshine get you! I reject wussification insofar as I legally can, but I am still and will always be one of the wimpy ones in the clinic when I'm on the receiving end of that needle business. So, if you're afraid of needles and therefore have not yet tried acupuncture, this post is for you. If I can do it, you can do it.