Archive for tag: boards

Surviving Boards

I survived the weekend. I was wondering if I would. Although I'm not entirely sure I'm still intact. As I've said before, there's not really anything that can prepare you for boards. All of the studying, reviewing, and cramming isn't going to make everything magically retrievable in the head. There's always something that slips through there. We hope that it's not too much, but in the end, it's not the things that we remember that we worry about.

Now that boards are over and the waiting game has begun, I've had a tiny bit of sleep and I'm now focusing on regrouping and moving forward. Job hunting is in the definitive future, and with that comes the prospect of moving. Moving brings with it a mixed bag of reminiscing and looking forward. Today I pulled a box out of my living room that had some old cords, digital cameras, and random electrical stuff. I plugged in the cameras and found myself reliving moments over the last couple of years and wondering what I was thinking. For a while I was writing myself notes on the chalkboard at the entrance to the house. I called them "Notes from the Chalkboard."

2014-11-20_chalkboard1      2014chalkboard2

Now that, hopefully, Part IV boards are behind me, I'm working on the next chapter. It's been no great shock to my classmates that I hope to leave Florida. Preliminary job hunting has illuminated a couple of options, but more need to come. My heart has been elsewhere for a long time. Seeing these boards written years ago reminds me. It's time to clear the muddle of my mind, free my heart, and fly.

Have a Great Week Everyone! If I don't reach you before Thanksgiving, have an AMAZING Turkey Day.

Doctors (Almost) as Patients

I HATE being injured. I REALLY hate it. Inevitably, the doctor becomes the patient. And everything that you hear about doctors being horrible patients -- is completely and utterly true. We're non-compliant, cranky, and just generally difficult. And if you can imagine the worst of the worst patients -- that would be me.

Why am I telling you this? Well, on Saturday, I hurt my back. I've done it before, but this time seemed to be worse. There's something extremely humbling about not being able to do all the things you normally do: get in and out of a chair, put on pants, walk. We don't think about it. They've become second nature; we take them for granted. And even as (almost) doctors, even though we've maybe felt the pain before, it's really easy to forget how it feels.

2014-11-14_pic1

I hobbled into the office Monday morning, and declared, "I need to be seen by whomever is available as soon as possible." People cleared their schedules. They juggled patients. People gave up their treatment times to help me (Thanks, Dave). I sat and filled out the same paperwork we give to patients. Where is the pain? Does it radiate? What does it feel like? If you've ever been on the filling out end of these papers, I'm sure you know what I mean when I say -- trying to fit how you feel into a form or a diagram is HARD. I still wrote in the margins.

When my time came, my intern took me back into the patient rooms and I sat and experienced everything that our patients experience: the waiting, the orthopedic tests (some confounding and some painful), the range of motion, the poking and prodding. She drew up a treatment plan, the doc looked it over, and she went to work.

I'll spare everyone the details, but after a few adjustments and some soft tissue work, I was sent on my way, to do that to a patient myself.

2014-11-14_pic2

It never hurts to be reminded what it feels like. I'm doing better -- getting a little bit better every day. I'm grateful that there's a whole team of people here to take care of me, which is helping me take care of everybody else.

Special thanks to Leslie, this week, for getting me back on my feet.

Have a great one everyone! I'll be taking part IV boards this weekend, along with many of my classmates. Good luck to everyone!

Better Late Than Never

I find myself having the hardest time believing that school is almost over. As I sit here contemplating what to write, my mind wanders over things like jobs, moving, and what will happen next. It's terrifying, and exciting. It also feels like the most daunting prospect I've ever come across.

I'm starting to look at job postings. In some ways it seems presumptuous. After all, it's about 6 months away. And at the same time, I can't help but look. How early is too early to apply? Maybe I should buy someone's practice. Is that really something that I can accomplish? Maybe I should just work somewhere for a while rather than try to make things move on my own. I just can't quite wrap my head around all of this just yet. There are so many decisions to make. Where do I begin?

2014-11-06_calm

Meanwhile, back at the ranch...

We've had nearly record high numbers of patients at the clinic for the last couple of weeks. We were shy about 8 last week. Given the number of cancelations and no-shows that we had, we would have far surpassed the clinic's highest record. We're lucky to have all of the SPC students and faculty, as well as the other NUHS students and faculty as our patient base. It allows us to see a wide variety of people with an even wider variety of conditions: from eczema to complex neurological syndromes. Rarely a day goes by without something unusual. My patients keep me guessing, and laughing. I really appreciate the sense of humor in many of them. Even in the midst of pain, they still find time for a smile. It makes my day go that much easier.

Last week, Julia, Dr. Jourdan, and myself hosted an NUHS booth at SPC's career day. We were tucked back in the back, but got a chance to let a few people know about the school, what we do, and what we offer to other students there. Most of the students at the career fair were nurses. That didn't stop them from picking up brochures about the school. We're thinking that maybe we'll end up with a couple of new students from the day. We've already had a few start as patients. It's great to get a chance to talk to people, have them get excited about what we do, and then see them bring it to fruition.

I guess that's what it's all about, right? Getting your foot in the door? Maybe that brings me back to looking for a job. I've had people come out of the woodwork in the strangest of places, offering me information or connections. As much as I loathe the concept of networking (yes, I mean that), having conversations with people and finding out there's some type of mutual interest -- now that's making a connection.

Hope everyone has a great week. I'll be working and studying for Part IV boards. We're getting closer...

Anticipation - Participation

Anticipation...

It's hard to describe that feeling of waiting for board scores. If you are lucky, the days and weeks following a board exam are busy enough to distract from what feels like impending doom. The day gets put on the calendar and slowly approaches. The night before, there's this nagging feeling like something big is happening tomorrow. And then there's the sinking feeling, when I realize what it is. The nausea sets in, and maybe a headache. Time ticks so extremely slowly. It's like Christmas Eve, and you're 6 years old, but waiting for the zombie apocalypse. Morning comes. 8 am rolls around. Scores are in. Sitting in clinic seeing patients, I try not to think about what's waiting for me. Others have already checked. They passed! Congrats to them. I want to throw up.

I'm sure that they're smarter than I am. They must be; they passed. I don't know what my scores are. I'm too chicken to check. Patients roll through the clinic and I am trying not to think about it. Good thing I have complicated patients. "Thanks for the challenges and the distractions," I keep thinking to myself. Oh no. I remember what I have to do when I get home. The day is over. And even though I've stayed late to try to distract myself and get all of my paperwork done, I don't want to go home. I don't want to see my scores. It's the end of the world.

I make the drive, get home, and Grey meets me at the door. "I have to do something," I say. He's telling me about his day. I sit down and open my computer: NBCE in the Google window. And then I wait. All that stress to a final moment I click on the link: September 2014 scores. Click. One eye open, the other looking through fingers, squinting, scared -- Grey is still talking to me, trying to distract me. I can't look. I open my eyes. No stars. NO STARS!!!! There are NO STARS!!!! I passed. (Stars mean that a score isn't passing. If there's a star there, then the score is too low.) All of that stress for absolutely nothing. The scores are fine. OK, now I can go on with my life. Done. *Whew*

Participation...

Now that all of that's done...

Last week, I had the great pleasure of participating in "All College Day" for SPC. At All College Day, all of the SPC campuses and staff come together for workshops and seminars. It also gives all of the University Partnership Program participants and affiliates a chance to come out, remind people that we're still here, do some demonstrations, and hopefully bring some new patients to the clinic. There were two sessions, a morning and afternoon. Julia, Daniele, Brian, and Manuel held down the fort in the morning, and Theresa, Antoinette, and I kept things under control in the afternoon. Of course, Dr. Harrison accompanied us throughout the day. It was a great day!

2014-10-30_table

Many of the staff weren't aware that the clinic was available for them. I've said this before, but I always love the response I get from people when they hear "free healthcare." We were using the G4 Massager and giving free massages, and also performing postural screening and giving evaluations. It was a TON of fun. It's nice to get out of the office every once in a while and do some outreach. But also amazing to reach some new people, and see them come into the clinic shortly thereafter. It's also great to see some of our patients out running around in their natural environments.

2014-10-30_trio

Lots of incredible things coming up in the next few weeks; I'm on to the next great adventure. Part IV Boards.

Have a Great One, Everybody!!!!!

Fueled by Caffeine and Dreams

I'm recovering from near brain-death. In case you missed it, last weekend (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) a group of us took boards: Physiotherapy, Part II, and Part III. I wish I could say it was 3 days full of fun-filled magical awesomeness, but I think you guys know me well enough to know I'd be lying through my teeth.

We all survived the weekend, in large part due to the support we gave each other. Julia was my right-hand this weekend. She made me study when I didn't want to, go over questions, and made sure I got out of the hotel room on time (and didn't get lost too badly getting back and forth from the hotel). Ricky and Alid were the humor for the weekend. The four of us (including Julia) and two of Alid's friends from Palmer, went for dinner after PT. I honestly thought we would be kicked out of the restaurant, we were laughing so hard. It was just what I needed to keep me going another day.

It was great to see the smiling faces of people we've taken tests with before from other schools, and also of each other. Kind words of encouragement were given by so many. Leslie, Bryan, Julia, Alid, Theresa, Ricky, Roshaun, and Dave: My huge thanks to you guys for keeping me going this past weekend -- even if you didn't realize that's what you were doing.

2014-09-17_spoon
Image Source: www.etsy.com/listing/181470539/

It was a weekend fueled by caffeine and lack of sleep. We learned how little sleep we could survive on, how many questions we could answer in a short period of time, and how much caffeine was required to take an exam at 7:00 a.m. We were laughing at each other and our test-taking strategies, how long it took to finish certain exams, and how much we were stressing about something really and truly out of our control.

Boards are interesting, because you've been studying for them all along. There's really nothing to "cram" for, and yet we cram every time. Of course, it doesn't hurt to refresh memory on what we've not seen for a couple of years even. Part I, last year, was a test of the basic sciences. While these were more clinical, the basic science stuff just doesn't go away. There's always something that didn't get covered, that we haven't heard before, or that we've never seen. There are questions on every test that make no sense, and like all standardized test, more than enough opportunities to overthink something. I've always been baffled at how any exam in medicine can be made into a "Multiple Guess" test -- when everything we do in medicine is completely essay.

But, we survive. No! We endure. And however the scores come out, they come out. We'll take them as they come.

2014-09-17_comic
Image Source: www.flickr.com/photos/thomas_r/8225164573/

In other news, clinic is in full swing. At the HEC NUHS Student Clinic, we are BUSY. We've been seeing sports physicals and regular patients -- several every day. As the term gets underway for the SPC students, we'll be seeing less of some sports physicals, and more of others. I believe we're serving at least 3 different sports teams now -- so there will be no shortage there.

I'm finishing up a quarter for the Master's program at UWS. Finals are this week. Hard to come back and tackle that after last week. But I'm SO looking forward to two weeks off with no pressing studies. Next quarter with them starts in a few weeks with Sports Nutrition and Fitness, Gastrointestinal Imbalances, and Oxidative/Reductive Dynamics and Energy Production. Sounds like a party.

Have a Great week, Everybody!!!!