Massage Info Night Unites Graduates with Incoming Students

Admissions Staff - Deb CascioLast night's Massage Therapy Information Night highlighted a visit from our alumnus, Peg Ortega. Peg treated the guests to an interactive demonstration of several massage techniques used by therapists. Each guest followed Peg's lead and performed the techniques on their own arms. This was a great way for future students to experience the sensations and benefits of just a few of the techniques they will be learning in the future.

Another alumnus, Matt Clemente, took our guests on a tour to see one of our 30 cadavers. Since we teach our anatomy and physiology on cadavers, it's important for future students to have that initial experience. Looking at a muscle on a human being as opposed to a textbook gives our students an advantage like no other. This is just one of the reasons our graduates excel when taking their National Board exams and are sought after therapists. 

Using the cadaver, Matt pointed out how successful massage can be in treating afflictions such as carpel tunnel syndrome and frozen shoulders. By trying a less intrusive option, some clients realize relief and can avoid surgery.

Dr. Randy Swenson, vice president for academic services, finished the evening with an overview of the curriculum. He pointed out the importance of learning anatomy as a foundation, a variety of techniques to make a well-rounded therapist, and the business elements National includes in its program to produce a confident professional.

It was a great event! The next scheduled Information Night is July 16th. Reservations are accepted online or by calling 630-889-6566.

NUHS Grads Featured in News Segment on Healing Power of Touch

Two NUHS massage therapy grads, Janet Ziegler ('09) and Dorothy Topounova ('09), were featured in a recent news segment on the healing power of touch.

Here is a link to the full article on "The Science of Touch," while below is the news segment from WGN's Living Healthy Chicago.

The best news is that Janet Zeigler also teaches in the massage therapy program at NUHS, offering a class on healing touch for special populations, including massage therapy in hospice settings.

Bringing massage therapy to wider populations, such as those in hospice or suffering from dementia, is just one way our grads are defining the future of integrated health care.

AMTA's Career Resources in Massage Therapy

The American Massage Therapy Association has new Career Guidance and Job Bank resources on its website that can help you explore your options as a massage therapist.

One of our favorite pages under Career Guidance is the Workplace Options page. Here, you can learn more about the many massage settings you can choose from once you have your license, such as: franchises, fitness ad sports centers, medical and health care settings, self-employment and spas. There's a downloadable PDF for each option describing what you'll need to learn, what you can expect, wage estimates, and more!

There is even a Career Path Quiz that can analyze your personal interests, preferences, work style, and make suggestions as to which massage therapy venues might be best for you.

So check it out, and then check out our NUHS massage therapy program and so you can apply and get on your way to an exciting new career.

Massage Therapy Ranks High on Best 100 Jobs

The U.S. News and World Report online money and career guide has great news for those considering a career in massage therapy. It ranks massage therapist as #17 on a list of Best Health Care Jobs. Furthermore, it ranks massage therapists as #27 on their list of "100 Best Jobs" overall.

The article discusses the pros and cons of massage therapy, as well as training requirements and salary data. According to their data, the median salary for a massage therapist is currently $35,970, while the upper 10% of massage professionals earn $70,140. Furthermore, it states that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that jobs for massage therapists will grow 22.6% between 2012 and 2022, adding 30,000 more professionals to this field.

Read the U.S. News article here, and then learn how you can get started on your new massage therapy career at National University of Health Sciences.

Massage Can Help Those with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

2014-01-15_knee _smIn two separate studies, massage therapy shows promise in reducing pain and increasing the range of motion for those with osteoarthritis of the knee.

One study had a group of patients attend supervised self-massage sessions twice a week, and taught them a regimen of self-massage techniques to use at home. At the end of the study, researchers found an overall improvement in stiffness, function and pain for the intervention group, while a control group that did not participate in the self-massage remained the same.

In a second study, patients receiving regular weekly or bi-weekly massage showed reduced pain and stiffness and increased functionality.

Here is a summary of both studies prepared by the American Massage Therapy Association.

It's great to know that massage therapy may have the potential to reduce reliance on prescription and over-the-counter pain medication in osteoarthritis of the knee.