Bachelor of Biomedical Science

Course Descriptions

When you earn your Bachelor's degree in Biomedical Science from National University of Health Sciences, you can choose any of our courses in order to meet your credit requirements for graduation.  Those choosing and Emphasis in Nutrition will need to include at least 19 credits in nutrition courses.

Biology

BIOL133 Research Methods & Statistics - 3 Credits
All health care professionals and individuals involved in biological sciences depend on research results for new information in their field. This course provides the foundation for understanding basic research methods and the application of research findings to the health care industry. Topics covered in this course include fundamentals of research design, research ethics, basic biostatistics, and other research-related issues applicable to future health care providers and other individuals interested in the biological sciences.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring only

BIOL201 Human Physiology I: Control Systems - 3 Credits
The physiology of the cell and human neuromuscular control systems will be investigated where topics include the cell structure and function, movement of molecules across cell membranes, homeostatic mechanisms and cellular communication, neural control mechanisms, sensory systems, and muscle physiology.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL201S Human Physiology I: Control Systems - 3 Credits (15 week course)
The anatomy and physiology of the cell and human biological control systems will be investigated. Topics include cell structure and function, movement of molecules across cell membranes, homeostatic mechanisms and cellular communication, neural control mechanisms, sensory systems, hormonal control systems, muscle physiology, and control of body movments.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL203 Human Physiology II: Body Functions - 3 Credits
The physiology of the major organ systems of the human body will be investigated. Topics include the hormonal control systems, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory and digestive systems.
Prerequisite: At least one first-year biology course with an emphasis on physiology or cell biology.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL203S Human Physiology II: Body Functions - 3 Credits (15 week course)
The anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems of the human body will be investigated. Topics include cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, reproductive, immune and digestive systems, and the components of blood.
Prerequisite: At least one first-year biology course with an emphasis on physiology or cell biology.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL205 Human Physiology Lab - 1 Credit
Student will perform 10 laboratory exercises illustrating fundamental principles in physiology. The labs will inolve exercises covering the following topics: cell transport and membrane permeability; skeletal muscle and neurophysiology; mechanisms involving the endocrine, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems; as well as function and regulation in renal system physiology and acid-bas balance..
Corequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL221 Anatomy 1 - 4 Credits
In this course, students will learn in both lecture and laboratory formats, the basic concepts of human anatomy with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. Basic concepts such as anatomical terminology, position and relationship will be discussed in order to provide a foundation onto which other anatomical concepts will be taught. In addition, the normal gross anatomy of the musculoskeletal system (including the osteology, arthrology and myology of the different anatomical regions) and the spinal cord will be presented. The gross anatomy laboratory sessions will be presented using a regional approach in order to facilitate greater integration of the lecture material.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL223 Anatomy II - 4 Credits
In this course, students will learn in lecture and laboratory formats, the normal gross structures of the human brain (including special senses and the autonomic nervous system) and organ systems. The organ systems discussed are the cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, endocrine, urinary, digestive, and reproductive. In addition, the structural interrelationships between organ systems will be explained as well as the interrelationships between structure and function of organs and organ systems. The gross anatomy laboratory sessions will be presented using a regional approach and will be designed to support the lecture sessions and address related basic science issues.
Prerequisite: BIOL221
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL231 General Microbiology - 3 Credits
This course will introduce students to the microbial world. General properties of microorganisms including classification, morphologic and growth characteristics, metabolism, and genetics will be discussed. The methods to study microorganisms will be discussed in detail. Students will explore the applications of microbiology to modern diagnostics and biotechnology. The course will consist of didactic and group discussion format. Students will be assessed with periodic quizzes and exams in multiple choice, essay and modified essay format.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL241 Biopsychology - 3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to understanding the function of the human brain and its relation to behavior. The first goal of this course is for students to integrate a basic understanding of the anatomy and neurology of the brain information into their existing knowledge base. The second goal of this course is to provide students an adequate framework about basic principles in biopsychology so that information may be incorporated in an understanding of holistic health care. A topical format is employed focusing on relevant health care issues. Topics include the structure and function of the nervous system related to a combination of the following topics: human brain damage, vision, movement, eating and drinking, sex, sleep, drug addiction, learning and memory, neuroplasticity, lateralization, emotions, stress, mental disorders, and health. To accomplish these goals, the topical information will be presented through a combination of lectures, discussions, and readings beyond the textbook.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Spring

BIOL301 Histology - 3 Credits
This histology course is a study of the microscopic and ultramicroscopic structure of mammalian tissues and organs, i.e., microscopic anatomy. Special emphasis is placed on the relation of structure to function. This course gives students a thorough and detailed overview of the various human tissues and organs. This is an upper level course designed for students who want intensive preparation in microanatomy.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Summer only

BIOL302 Exercise Physiology - 3 Credits
Exercise physiology is an applied discipline that combines knowledge of metabolic biochemistry, cellular and organ system physiology, and anatomic structure and function in order to understand and explain physical and athletic performance. In this course, students will be introduced to the metabolic, muscular, and cardio-respiratory adaptations to both acute and chronic exercise in humans. The emphasis will be for students to learn and understand major concepts in terms of normal physiologic responses in healthy individuals.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Spring, Summer

BIOL303 Embryology - 3 Credits
This course includes the basic principles underlying vertebrate development. Topics will include gametogenesis, fertilization, germ layer formation, organogenesis, growth, differentiation, morphogenesis, and control of development. Some abnormal embryology is introduced that has some clinically significant outcomes.
Prerequisites: BIOL201
Offered: Fall

BIOL304 Basic Neuroscience - 3 Credits
Students will learn in a lecture and problem-based format the normal structures and functions (with minor emphasis on clinical) of the human nervous system. Emphasis will be primarily on basic science issues related to normal anatomy and functions of the human nervous system.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Fall, Spring only

BIOL305 Genetics - 3 Credits
Genetics has emerged as a central discipline in biology, and with the now-completed sequencing of the human genome, it is evident that all fields of biology can be related to the DNA possessed by the organism. This course will provide the fundamental tools required to understand the language of genetics.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall

BIOL306 Cell Biology - 3 Credits
This course is designed to provide a first look at what is known and how scientists are going about trying to understand the way in which living things operate at the most fundamental (but perhaps least understood) level -- the molecular level. It is also a goal of this course to have students expose themselves to research concerning molecular biology that is reported in the primary research journals of science.
Furthermore, Cell Biology 306 is a transition course in both the biology and biochemistry majors. It is built upon a foundation of introductory biology and chemistry and is designed to prepare students for upper division work in biochemistry, molecular biology, neurobiology, developmental biology, and immunology. These disciplines, in turn, form the foundation of modern medicine.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Spring only

BIOL333 Immunology - 3 Credits
This course will introduce students to the body's defenses. Different components of immune system, nonspecific and specific immunity will be discussed. The different cellular elements and biochemical mediators involved in immune response will be discussed in detail. Students will explore the applications of immunology to modern diagnostics, biotechnology and therapeutics. There will be an introduction to immunologic disorders. The course will consist of didactic and group discussion format. Students will be assessed with periodic quizzes and exams in multiple choice, essay and modified essay format.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Fall, Summer

BIOL337 Pathophysiology - 3 Credits
    The pathophysiology course is designed to introduce the student to basic pathologic processes and their applications to major pathologic conditions. The course work will include study of mechanisms of disease, causative and contributory factors, and an introduction to traditional as well as complementary and alternative management approaches. The instruction will be in the form of online learning resources including power points. The assessment will be based on discussion forums and online multiple choice tests, midterm and final exams.
    Prerequisite: BIOL203
    Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL400 Independent Study - 1-3 Credits
Prerequisite: May be taken only to fulfill graduation requirements
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIOL403 Introduction to Epidemiology - 3 Credits
The definition of epidemiology is the 'study of disease.' Originally, epidemiologists only studied infectious disease epidemics such as plague and cholera; however, today's society is also interested in the prevalence of chronic diseases such as heart disease, asthma, and low back pain. This course covers all aspects of an epidemiological investigation: from risk factors for disease, to rate calculations, to surveillance methods to determine changing disease patterns. Modern epidemics will be discussed.
Prerequisite: BIOL133
Offered: Fall, Summer

Chemistry

CHEM111 General Chemistry I - 3 Credits
Foundations of chemistry, atoms and molecules. Principles of stoichiometry, chemical reactions, properties of gases, periodicity and chemical bonding. Energy changes in chemical systems and electronic structure of atoms and molecules. Examination of the chemical reactivity of common elements, inorganic and organic compounds.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM113 General Chemistry II - 3 Credits (accelerated 8-week course)
Properties of liquids and solutions, and principles of acid-base equilibria, solubility and electrochemical processes. Examination of chemical kinetics and equilibria.
Prerequisite: CHEM111 or equivalent
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM115 General Chemistry Laboratory - 1 Credit
Illustrative computer experiments in general chemistry involving gas equilibrium, le Chatelier's principle, acid/base titrations and qualitative inorganic analysis.
Prerequisite: CHEM111 or equivalent
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM201 Organic Chemistry I - 3 Credits
Structure and bonding in organic chemistry, Isomerism and stereoisomerism in organic compounds. Chemistry of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Aromatic compounds and mechanisms of aromatic substitution. Nucleophilic addition and substitution reactions and the chemistry of alcohols.
Prerequisite: CHEM115 or equivalent
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM201S Organic Chemistry I - 3 Credits (15 week course)
Structure and bonding in organic chemistry, Isomerism and stereoisomerism in organic compounds. Chemistry of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Aromatic compounds and mechanisms of aromatic substitution. Nucleophilic addition and substitution reactions. Chemistry of alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, and ketones.
Prerequisite: CHEM113 or equivalent
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM203 Organic Chemistry II - 3 Credits
The chemistry of ethers, aldehydes and ketones, as well as carboxylic acids and their derivatives will be investigated. Amines, related nitrogen compounds and heterocylclic compounds will also be investigated. Applications of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry and an introduction to biochemistry with the examination of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids will be investigated.
Prerequisite: CHEM201
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM203S Organic Chemistry II - 3 Credits (15 week course)
Chemistry of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, as well as amines and related nitrogen compounds. Applications of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry. Introduction to biochemistry, which will examine amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Structure and properties of proteins and enzymes.
Prerequisite: CHEM201 or equivalent
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM205 Organic Chemistry Laboratory - 1 Credit
Illustrative computer experiments in organic synthesis and organic qualitative analysis utilizing basic organic techniques (distillation, crystallization), reactions (esterfication, oxidation, addition, substitution, elimination), and spectrometry instrumentation (NMR and IR).
Prerequisite: CHEM201
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM301 Biochemistry - 4 Credits
This course focuses on the chemistry of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, with special emphasis on representative proteins and enzymes, including hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochromes P450.
Prerequisite: BIOL203
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM401 Principles of Pharmacology - 4 Credits
This course provides an introdcution to the use of drugs in western medicine for the treatment of disease. Topics covered in this course will be a description of drug names and classification, general principles of drug action and metabolism. A large part of this course will be a description of the drag actions on body systems including all the major disorders and diseases in each of the systems of the body. Included will be a description of the mechanism of action, major side effects and contraindications for each drug and drug category. Interactions with other drugs and botanicals as well as a description of the nutrients which are depleted by each of the drugs will be covered. Drug actions on infection and immune system regulaton as well as drug abuse and chemical dependency will be described.
Prerequisite: CHEM301
Offered: Spring

Communications

COM101 Introduction to Health Care Professions - 1 Credit
This course will allow the Bachelor of Biomedical Science student and the students in the Prerequisite Program to obtain information regarding the rights, responsibilities, scope of practice, and daily routine of the following doctorate and master of science health care professions such as, but not limited to: allopathic, chiropractic, dental, naturopathic, oriental, and osteopathic medicine, PhD, pharmacology and physical therapy forms of health care, Students will obtain seven hours of in-class discussions regarding the individual health care fields and an onsite visit for the remaining eight hours, and/or clinical observation of the practices based upon the students' interest and the course directors' determination. Students will report their observations and distribute information obtained during their on-site experiences to the class in a written format and discuss their insight into these fields of medicine.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Spring, Summer only

COM103 Medical Spanish - 3 Credits
Clinical Spanish is a 45-hour elective focused on Spanish language skills used in clinical practice. The course emphasizes the key role of the patient history in making a diagnosis, the evaluation of clinical evidence such as patient symptoms, and relevant statistical concepts such as predictive value. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying common symptoms are reviewed. This course is based on listening and speaking skills rather than on reading and writing. There are no written exercises and no written tests or exams.
Prerequisites: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

COM105 Computer Software - 3 Credits
This course allows students to gain a working knowledge of Microsoft Office using a variety of hands-on activities. Word processing (Word), spreadsheet (Excel), PowerPoint presentation software, and a Web-based course management system (Blackboard) applications will be presented. Information provided in this course relates to concepts that students can use to develop confidence, independence, and resourcefulness in college, and in other courses. Students interested in acquiring or improving their knowledge and skill in Microsoft Office would benefit from this course.
Prerequisite: Keyboard and general computer skills
Offered: Spring only

COM107 Diagnostic Art - 3 Credits
This course explores and describes the observational skills used by artists in depicting various medical problems, and emphasizes related observational skills used in clinical practice. The key role of observation in the diagnosti process is emphasized, supported by concepts and methods of evidence-based medicine as they relate to clinical diagnosis. Relevant mechanisms of perception are reviewed, and the links between art history and the history of medicine. Analysis of medically relevant visual art is used as an instructional strategy comparable to the use of critical incidents or case histories. Analogies of visual images as related in music are also discussed.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

COM110    Certificate Test Preparation for the Strength and Conditioning Specialist and Personal Trainer - 2 Credits
    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, neurology, endocrinology, and energy systems, and other knowledge in order to pass the CSCS Exam. The course will then provide the student with an understanding of how these various forms of training affect these various systems. Topics which will be covered include: concepts and applications of exercise science; testing and evaluation, exercise techniques, program design, and organization and administration. Note: This course does NOT count toward the BS degree.
    Prerequisites: For the CSCS, a BS degree; for the personal trainer, a biology course.
    Offered: Fall, Spring Summer

Math

MATH135 College Algebra - 3 Credits
The study of algebra with emphasis on applications. Topics include functions, inequalities, polynomials, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, determinants, matrices, sequences, and series. Applications will be made in the social and medical sciences.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH145 Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus - 3 Credits
A formal study of algebra with strong emphasis on concepts needed for calculus. Topics include functions, inequalities, polynomials, rational functions, basic logarithmic and exponential functions, combinatorial mathematics, determinants and matrices. Basic trigonometric functions and identities will also be studied. Applications will be made.
Prerequisite: Math 135
Offered: Spring

MATH155 Calculus for Biological Sciences - 3 Credits
This is a one-semester course designed to provide an introduction to the essentials of calculus covering techniques, methods and applications of differentials and integrals. Topics include: an overview of derivatives and integrals (antiderivatives), the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and applications in health science. This course emphasizes the mastery of key concepts with the primary aim of helping students to learn, understand, explain, and use calculus. In addition, it is desired that students will improve their mathematical skills and further their understanding of mathematics and its applications to health sciences.
Prerequisite: MATH145
Offered: Summer

Nutrition

NU201 Basic Nutrition - 3 Credits
Basic principles of human nutrition, including the physical and chemical nature of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and metals will be discussed. Included in this course are cell metabolism and energy balance. Water and electrolyte balance and acid balance are covered as well as absorption, distribution metabolism and excretion of the elements discussed.
Prerequisite: BIOL201
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NU301 Nutrition In Health & Disease - 4 Credits
This is an introductory course to the utilization of nutrients and supplements for the prevention and treatment of major diseases found in western culture, including diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, skin, and gastrointetinal tract, as well as metabolic disorders. There will be a special emphasis on welness and dietary issues. The major emphasis is an explanation of the disease process as a totality of dietary and lifestyle concerns in the western world. Wellness theory as an holistic matter is covered in a general manner.
Prerequisite: NU201
Offered: Fall, Spring only

NU302 Advanced Human Nutrition - 3 Credits
This course is a continuation of NU301, Nutrition in Health and Disease, but issues such as school and hospital dietary eating plans are included. The dietary issues covered in NU301 will be expanded to include supplemental, dietary and some introduction to botanical and pharmacological influences on nutrients, wellness, and health and disease. Special emphasis will be on cardiovascular and matabolic diseases as they relate to the western diet. Fad diets as they influence society in the western culture are covered in this course.
Prerequisite: NU301
Offered: Summer only

NU303 Nutrition in the Life Cycle - 3 credits
Nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, growth and development, infants, pediatrics, adolescence, teenage young adults, adults and geriatric issues are covered. The nutrition issues which change and those which become necessary as we go through the stages of life are covered in detail. A special emphasis on pediatric and geriatric issues will be addressed considering the importance of these two populations as our citizens become older on the aberage and our newborn infants are exposed to increasingly negative challenges such as xenobiotics and allergens.
Prerequisite: NU201
Offered: Spring, Summer

NU304 Food Science (Emphasizing Microbiology and Safety) - 3 Credits
In this course, food safety concerns such as pesticides, drug additives, food labeling laws, government control regulations, and food-borne diseases are addressed. Special emphasis will be on microbiological issues, such as those found in food processing, food storage and food preparation. All of the microbes that are involved in food poisoning will be discussed.
Prerequisite: NU201
Offered: Fall, Spring

NU305 Sports and Physical Performance Nutrition - 3 Credits
Energy sources for physical and athletic performance and sports are covered in the course. Stress management and physical fitness as it relates to nutrition, diet and exercise will be stressed as well as performance-enhancing nutrients and drugs. IOC regulations are also addressed. Special emphasis will be on the biochemical pathways and the physiological responses to the supplements utilized by those athletes in endurance and strength and body building events. The concepts of anaerobic threshold as well as lactic acid build-up are addressed.
Prerequisite: NU201
Offered: Fall, Summer

NU307 Introduction to Botanicals and Herbs - 3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of herbal suppplements for common ailments and prevention of diseases that are encountered in every day life. The following topics will be discussed in this course: mechanism of botanical action, indications and contraindications of botanicals, clinical problems, and a listing of botanicals.
Prerequisite: NU201
Offered: Spring, Summer

Physics

PHYS111 Physics 1 - 3 Credits
An algebra and trigonometry-based study of classic (linear/rotational) kinematics and dynamics (including one-dimensional and two-dimensional motion, two-dimensional force analysis, work, energy, power, impulse, momentum, and collisions). This course also covers elasticity (axial and sheer), simple harmonic motion, fluids, waves, sounds, and electric circuits. This course is intended for students with a mathematical background in algebra and right angle trigonometry.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHYS111S Physics 1 - 3 Credits (15 week course)
Non-calculus-based study of classical linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics (including work, energy, impulse, momentum, and collisions), fluids, periodic motion, sound and wave motion.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHYS113S Physics 2 (15 week course) - 3 Credits
Non-calculus-based study of electrostatics, electric fields, Gauss' law, capacitance, current, resistance, magnetic forces and fields, electromagnetic induction, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics, as well as an introduction to quantum physics.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Summer only

PHYS115 Physics Laboratory - 1 Credit (accelerated 8-week course)
Interactive computer experiments dealing with the fundamental properties of the physical world. The laboratories are designed in a way that allows for the manipulation of various parameters, which result in real time changes in the simulated experiment.
Prerequisite: PHYS111
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHYS117     Physics Laboratory 2 - 1 Credit
   
This is a course that will allow students to learn/experience a "hands-on" approach physics that would be a companion course to the Physics 111S lecture or taken independently. The lab will comprise those experiments that are important to the understanding of the Laws and Concepts of College Physics as it prepares the students for a course in science that furthers their education or prepares them for a career in the arena of science-based health care.
    Prerequisite: PHYS111S
    Offered Fall, Spring, Summer

PHYS211 Kinesiology - 3 Credits
Understanding human activity from a mechanical and physiological perspective so to address major issues, which include reducing the risk of injury, optimizing exercise prescription and understanding clinical evaluations. Functional anatomy, muscle and passive tissue mechanics, anthropometry, electromyography, and linked segment mechanics are introduced and applied to clinical, occupational and athletic situations. Basic concepts of cardiovascular, respiratory and thermoregulatory responses to physical activity.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Public Health

PUBH 211     Introduction to Public Health - 3 Credits
    Considered in this course are the basic concepts related to public and community health. Many students of the "sciences" focus on the details of each discipline of science (biology, chemistry, etc.) without understanding how these disciplines play roles in the health of the public in general. This course is designed to introduce the science of public health, including epidemiology, environmental health and health education. The history of public health and the basics of the U.S. health care system are also covered.
    Prerequisite: BIOL133 (Research)
    Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer


Terminology

TERM181 Medical Terminology - 3 Credits
This course is designed for students in the health care curriculum who need to be familiar with medical terms. It provides a framework for building a medical vocabulary. Emphasis will be on understanding basic medical terms, abbreviations and their meanings and how they are used in documenting and reporting patient care procedures. Information provided in this course will help students to succeed in their chosen health care careers by familiarizing them with how medical terms are formed and by providing a systematic learning structure. Practical applications are provided by exercises and medical record analysis. Students interested in acquiring or improving their knowledge of the language of health care would benefit from this course. The goal is to develop a basic working knowledge of the language of health care to serve as a basis for individual expansion.
Prerequisite: None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Public Health

PUBH211 Introduction to Public Health - 3 Credits
Considered in this course are the basic concepts related to public and community health. Many students of the "sciences" focus on the details of each discipline of science (biology, chemistry, etc.) without understanding how these disciplines play roles in the health of the public in general. This course is designed to introduce the science of public health, including epidemiology, environmental health and health education. The history of public health and the basics of the U.S. health care system are also covered.
Prerequisite: BIOL133 (Research)
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

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