Archive for tag: research

Celebrate National Massage Therapy Awareness Week with NUHS

As part of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) 20th annual National Massage Therapy Awareness week Oct. 23 - Oct. 29, massage therapists across the country are highlighting the benefits of massage therapy and encouraging others to incorporate massage into their personal wellness plans.

NUHS Massage Therapy faculty are currently celebrating at the AMTA 2016 National Convention in nearby Milwaukee. On Thursday, Jerrilyn Cambron, DC, LMT, MPH, Ph.D., chair of the College of Allied Health Sciences and Distance Education, will be presenting new research on massage therapy and pain. She will also be moderating a panel on massage therapy in the military.

Photo of woman receiving a massage

On Friday, NUHS MT students will attend Student Day where they will be able to connect with potential employers along with successful practitioners who will share their insights on networking, marketing and running a business.

In my previous blog post, I highlighted that the profession is expected to grow significantly in less than 10 years. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for massage therapists is projected to grow 23 percent by 2022, higher than the overall projected job growth of 10.8 percent.

With over 39.1 million people reported to have received a massage from July 2014 to July 2015, students are finding that the massage therapy profession can be a very successful one.

If you're interested in learning more about a career in massage therapy, explore the National University of Health Science's massage therapy program at an evening information night from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on November 16 at the Lombard campus.

At the event you can learn about the curriculum, explore career opportunities and talk with financial aid representatives. You can even talk with a graduate of the massage therapy program and get their perspective that a lot of prospective students find helpful.

Click here to RSVP and learn more.  

 

Pain Medicine Journal Explores Massage Therapy

PainMassage Therapy is getting lots of attention as an effective tool for pain.  Pain is a major public health concern that affects approximately 100 million Americans. Chronic pain accounts for 80% of physician visits and almost $600 billion in annual health care expenditures and lost productivity.

A leading scientific journal, Pain Medicine, recently published a series of research articles on the effectiveness of massage in reducing pain for a variety of conditions, including cancer and post-surgical pain.

Dr. Jerrilyn Cambron, a professor at National University of Health Sciences who co-authored the journal series, says: "These articles will go a long way in promoting massage therapy as an evidence-based approach to pain management."

National University has always considered massage therapy an important part of a new trend in health care called "integrative medicine." If you are thinking about starting a career in massage therapy, it's good to be familiar with this word.  Why?

Integrative medicine is where health professionals from different fields work together, joining their unique skills in a group effort as they work to get patients better. So articles such as these that show how massage helps pain will also help show MDs, hospitals and pain management clinics when to call on massage therapists to assist them in treating pain patients.

Why not visit National University to learn more on how you can study massage therapy on a campus devoted to integrative medicine, with faculty like Dr. Jerrilyn Cambron and other leaders in the profession? If you visit now through August 31st, you'll be eligible for a tuition incentive of $500 during National University's "Summer Soak Up" program.

An NUHS Student's Research in Massage

NUHS has a strong culture of supporting research by its faculty, graduate students, and students in its massage therapy program. The field of massage welcomes new research and case studies that track the benefits and applications of massage for various health conditions.

One massage student, Lauren Camer, did research at NUHS that culminated in a poster that she presented at a national conference after she graduated. She presented her poster at the 2013 American Massage Therapy Association National Convention in Fort Worth, Texas in September. Her topic was "Massage Therapy for Balance and Proprioceptive Deficits in a Juvenile: A Case Report."

2013-12-06_lauren _camer
Lauren Cramer presents her research at the AMTA National Convention

The poster was based on the case of a boy with balance problems who received ten 30-minute manual massage therapy treatments over the course of five weeks. The therapist performed balance assessments on the boy before, during and after the massage therapy sessions. Lauren's case study on the boy showed that massage provided a positive and lasting impact.

While working on her research project, Lauren appreciated mentorship from her clinical supervisor, Dr. Patricia Coe, as well as her co-author, NUHS clinical research coordinator, Jen Dexheimer.

"They were always available to answer questions, and helped me with the preliminary work I needed to do to get my research proposal approved by the university," says Lauren. 

Now that she has graduated from NUHS, Lauren Camer is currently a licensed massage therapist in Illinois. She has a mobile massage service in addition to providing corporate chair massages and working in a chiropractic physician's office part-time.

Research on Massage and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Recent findings from the Touch Research Institutes of the University of Miami School of Medicine show marked improvement in those suffering from rheumatoid arthritis after massage therapy.

Specifically, after moderate pressure massage therapy, those with rheumatoid arthritis had less pain, greater grip strength and improved range of motion in their upper limbs. (Read a summary of this latest research.)

2013-07-31_massagehand

In fact, the Arthritis Foundation has great things to say about massage therapy as a pain relief option for those living with arthritis. Research has shown that massage can lower the body's production of the stress hormone cortisol, and boost production of serotonin, which, in turn, can improve mood. Additionally, massage can lower production of the neurotransmitter substance P, often linked to pain, improving sleep as a result. (Read the three-page report on massage therapy and arthritis.)

When you train as a massage therapist in a clinical environment, you'll have more exposure to clients seeking massage for medical conditions, such as arthritis. A key advantage in earning your massage therapy certification at National University of Health Sciences is its internship in the on-campus integrative medical clinic. Here, you will not only practice massage geared toward relaxation and wellness, but also have the chance to work with clients referred by physicians from a variety of medical specialties. Your massage will be part of an over all treatment plan managed by the client's physician.

Dr. Cambron is President-Elect of Massage Therapy Foundation

Dr.CambronDr. Jerrilyn Cambron, professor at National University, has been elected "president elect" for the Massage Therapy Foundation. Her position will begin in March of 2013, and she will serve her two-year term as president from 2014 - 2016.

Dr. Cambron was previously elected to the Foundation's board of trustees in 2010, and became a vice president of the organization in 2012.

The focus of the Foundation is to "advance the knowledge and practice of massage therapy by supporting scientific research, education, and community service."
Dr. Cambron says, "These three tenets of research, education, and community service are exactly what I stand for as well, so as a massage therapist, the Foundation was a natural match for me. "

"The Massage Therapy Foundation's work is very exciting," says Dr. Cambron. "We have an international massage therapy research conference coming up, and also an online open-source journal that is indexed in PubMed. The Foundation gives out funding for research and community service projects, and is starting a webinar series on how to write case reports. In fact, we have a case-report contest for both students and practitioners." says Dr. Cambron.

Dr. Cambron serves on the faculty of National University's Research Department and in addition to her doctor of chiropractic degree, holds both a master's degree in public health and PhD from the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois-Chicago. She is also a licensed massage therapist and founder of MassageNet, a practice-based research network for massage therapists.