Pain Medicine Journal Explores Massage Therapy

PainMassage Therapy is getting lots of attention as an effective tool for pain.  Pain is a major public health concern that affects approximately 100 million Americans. Chronic pain accounts for 80% of physician visits and almost $600 billion in annual health care expenditures and lost productivity.

A leading scientific journal, Pain Medicine, recently published a series of research articles on the effectiveness of massage in reducing pain for a variety of conditions, including cancer and post-surgical pain.

Dr. Jerrilyn Cambron, a professor at National University of Health Sciences who co-authored the journal series, says: "These articles will go a long way in promoting massage therapy as an evidence-based approach to pain management."

National University has always considered massage therapy an important part of a new trend in health care called "integrative medicine." If you are thinking about starting a career in massage therapy, it's good to be familiar with this word.  Why?

Integrative medicine is where health professionals from different fields work together, joining their unique skills in a group effort as they work to get patients better. So articles such as these that show how massage helps pain will also help show MDs, hospitals and pain management clinics when to call on massage therapists to assist them in treating pain patients.

Why not visit National University to learn more on how you can study massage therapy on a campus devoted to integrative medicine, with faculty like Dr. Jerrilyn Cambron and other leaders in the profession? If you visit now through August 31st, you'll be eligible for a tuition incentive of $500 during National University's "Summer Soak Up" program.