Archive for tag: climbing

On Montanans and Thriving Outside

Thanks to new friends here in Billings, I spent most of the day this past Saturday climbing again, outside in the sun. It got so warm and wondrous that I had to hide away in the shade to keep from getting sunburned! In March! After hours of belaying and getting up on a few routes myself, I sat and watched the sun begin to set from our perch up on the rims north of town. I'd been outside on those rocks since noon, and was wishing I'd brought a picnic dinner so I could stay up there until the daylight left. All this time outdoors is absolutely bringing me alive. In one of my residency interviews, the doctor asked me how I refresh, how I ground myself, or how I rejuvenate. It took no thought at all to answer that I do this by spending time outdoors.

At the end of a brilliantly sunny day out climbing.

On Sunday I didn't manage to do anything serious like file my taxes or study for boards, but I did spend an hour or so running along the rims, drinking up the sky and clouds. After my run I headed to a backyard goodbye celebration for Dr. La Deana Jeane, one of the associate NDs at YNC who is leaving to do some doctoring that doesn't require her to sit at a desk all day. We ate delicious food (NDs have a way of providing the most spectacular spreads at their get-togethers), and sat around the fire playing games and music until it was dark and chilly. By the time we left, we all wore that wonderful smoky fire smell heavy on our clothes and in our hair.

Backtracking to Friday, I found myself again at the Yellowstone Valley Brewing Company dancing to Jalan Crossland's lively guitar-picking and foot-stomping. I followed for a few spins on the crowded dance floor, and was asked if I was a Something. People who've been in this part of the West for decades know each other by their family names. I, apparently, look like one of the Something girls (I can't remember the family name). I've been asked 3 times if I'm part of this native Montana family, and each time I say, "No," I kind of wish I could say, "Yes." I've heard it's hard to get in with these folks if your family hasn't been ranching in Montana or Wyoming since the Homestead Act. It seems that there's something about a doctor though, and a naturopath especially, that I think might cracks this insular world.

Entering the Yellowstone Naturopathic Clinic.

I've met several of the members of these old Western families at the clinic. Through our interactions, I've learned that they do not want to operate within the system, and that they've used natural medicine on their animals forever. This combination brings them to Naturopathy, because in Montana, our medicine still operates outside of the conventional healthcare system. Also, NDs and ranchers have a shared understanding of how the natural world affects both our individual and community health. 

I love the stories that come from the ranchers that visit the clinic. One woman illustrated the level of her fatigue by exclaiming, "I used to go out and lamb three hun'red head a' ewes, and now I can barely stand to lamb a hun'red!" Another rancher claims he can't make it in that week because it's calving season and they're just too damn busy for him to see the doctor about this virus. Another young rancher, when asked about her daily exercise tells us that she runs on the treadmill at least once a day, but really she's outside lifting and hauling, feeding cows and hefting her little boys around the ranch all day. She supposes that she gets plenty of exercise just by living her life, and she's absolutely right.

In the hallway at YNC.

I'll be perfectly honest here, a few weeks away from providing patient care myself, and I notice I'm losing some of the details of medicine because they sink into the depths of my brain as I fill it with organizing residency interviews, observing people, and spending time outdoors. One of the residents here at YNC confirmed for me that this is natural; she feels she lost some of that more immediate knowledge as soon as she finished school and played the waiting game on starting her job at YNC. She reassured me it'll just take spending some time with the material to get it back to the front of my brain. 

After this recent revelation, I know I'll need to make the effort to spend more time with my books again. I also know that I have more energy and I feel lighter every day since spending time outside on a regular basis. So, I guess it's OK that I've taken a break from the intensity of studies. For the first time since I started the ND program at NUHS, I feel a desperate need to move my body and burn up energy at the end of the day. This feeling solidifies the fact that I thrive in a place with accessible nature and sky. One more month for me here in Billings before I head back to Illinois for graduation... let's see how much time I can spend outside under this big sky!