Check Your Chamber Pots, Ladies

2015-01-29_potEver heard of "bedpan bullets?" If you take a multivitamin from the grocery store shelf, odds are high that your body is not absorbing the vitamins and minerals listed on the side of the bottle. Nurses have been finding mostly-intact tablets in the bedpans of patients for years, sometimes so undissolved that the popular brand name is still legible!

How could this be true? How could my beloved multivitamin, that I've watched TV commercials for thousands of times, be a total waste of money? I checked the side of the bottle! It says it's giving me 100% of my daily need for Niacin. What could go wrong?

2015-01-29_bedpanWell, yes, you are popping a one-a-day that shows 100%s for most of your vitamins and minerals...but that does not mean that those nutrients are bioavailable. Your body is not absorbing nearly 100%, but instead, just shooting the tablet out your other end.

"Studies have shown individual vitamin isolates in supplements are about 10% absorbed. Compare this to vitamins directly from a fresh plant source, which are 77% to 93% absorbed. Minerals in a supplement are even worse -- 1% to 5%. But, from a plant source like raw broccoli, the minerals are 63% to 78% absorbable." Read more at HealthGuidance.org.

2015-01-29_pillsThe jig is up. In December 2013, the Annals of Internal Medicine published three papers on the health outcomes of regularly taking multivitamin supplements. Each concluded that it's essentially worthless -- and potentially dangerous -- to pop that multivitamin. The studies specifically looked at improvements in memory and cognition and reduction in rates of cancer and cardiovascular disease. The editorial explanation put out with these papers argued against taking them, stating, "Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified, and they should be avoided." Check out this article from ScienceBasedMedicine.org, which links to all 3 referenced papers and the associated editorial:

2015-01-29_tomatoSo what should a well-meaning, crappy American diet-eating individual do to fill in the obvious gaps in whole-food nutrition?

Most of us have a diet comprised of eating out or eating prepackaged factory foods. If you do step up and buy (conventional) produce and chow down on that, you're inundating your body with pesticides. Plus, your apple has probably irradiated to improve shelf life by destroying its vital energy. Unless you are eating an entirely organic, local, vine- or tree-ripened and immediately consumed diet of all fresh foods, your body almost certainly is not bringing in the vitamins and minerals that it needs (nor the digestive enzymes needed to use them). Even with my backyard garden, attempts to eat organic and local, and cooking from scratch almost daily, I'm sure I'm still all nutritionally holey as the ole slice of Swiss cheese.

2015-01-29_cheeseThe next best thing to the above mentioned beautiful diet is to look for a supplement that is whole-food based and bioavailable. I'll give you a clue--you probably won't find it on the sale aisle at the Jewel. Talk to your knowledgeable healthcare professional today about what type of supplementation is appropriate for your body and lifestyle. Dietary therapy and associated nutritional counseling is part of the Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program, as "food therapy" is one of the long-standing branches of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Who else can help? Your chiropractor and your naturopathic doctor also go through extensive education on supplements--ask one of us!