Biomedical Science Students Explore Exercise Physiology

Have you ever wanted to learn more about what happens to the human body when we exercise? Exercise physiology is a course option in the biomedical science program at National University. It combines metabolic biochemistry, cellular and organ system physiology, as well as anatomic structure and function in order to understand and explain physical and athletic performance and how the body adapts to it.

In addition to learning the basics of exercise physiology, NUHS students go deeper.

Instructor Nancy Stienke gives students the chance to explore personal interests and take more control over what they learn. "The students write a paper reviewing the scientific literature on any exercise topic of their choosing. They also create a poster based on that information, and make a presentation on the topic the last week of class," she explains.

The students get lots of help in their research. "Our Learning Resource Center provides a workshop for them, teaching them how to search our electronic databases for the information they need," says Nancy. "They learn how to choose a topic that is broad enough to provide enough research to prepare a good review, but not so broad that it pulls up too much research to read."

Below are some of the research posters prepared by biomedical science students enrolled in the NUHS exercise physiology course. They cover topics such as health benefits of Yoga or Tai Chi, sports benefits for amputees, or resistance training for children.

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"The goal of this project is to give students a chance to work with the scientific literature and get a glimpse of what it takes to communicate information to the scientific community," says Nancy Stienke. "Professional posters are very common at scientific meetings. This project shows students the steps involved with creating a scientific poster, while also giving them greater expertise on their topic." 

For those who are eager to learn more about the human body from a sports medicine perspective, NUHS also offers courses in sports nutrition and kinesiology.

Read course descriptions for the biomedical science program at NUHS.

Bureau of Labor Stats on Careers with Biological Science Degree

A biomedical science degree falls in the category of biological science degrees. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics provides a website with a wealth of career outlook information for those with biological science degrees. On www.bls.gov you'll find several career categories in biomedical science, a job outlook for each profession, average salary information, descriptions of each career as well as necessary educational requirements.

For example, on www.bls.gov, you can explore biological science careers, such as:

Or you can search on the site for any term you like to find other science related careers and salary information.

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The good news is that between 2008 and 2018, the demand for biochemists should increase by 37%, and demand for microbiologists by 12%. All other biological scientists should see an increase in job growth of 19%. 

Many biomedical science degree graduates from National University of Health Sciences go on to earn an advanced or professional degree in health care. The great news from the Bureau of Labor Statistics is that the health care sector will continue to grow between now and 2020.

Learn more about finishing your bachelor's degree in biomedical science so that you can take advantage of the great momentum these statistics point to for those in science and health care careers.

A Word from Dr Richardson

In this video, hear Daniel Richardson, PhD, assistant dean for the College of Allied Health Sciences, explain the unique advantages of National University's bachelor degree completion program in biomedical science. A BS in biomedical science can be a springboard to excelling in advanced degrees and a variety of careers.


Dr. Richardson teaches botanical medicine to students in the BS program, and also teaches pharmacology courses in National University's graduate programs. This is one example of how our undergraduate students benefit in learning directly from graduate-level faculty members.

Learn more about how to complete your bachelor's degree in biomedical science at NUHS.

Career Information and Student Resources

Are you still wondering what you can do with a bachelor's degree in biomedical science? Check out the American Institute of Biological Sciences' website.  You'll find helpful career information, even a career brochure for what you can do with a biology degree.

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The AIBS is a nonprofit scientific association dedicated to advancing biological research and education for the welfare of society.  They are a resource for Congress when legislative decisions have a biological science component. They also have an informative website called Action Bioscience that keeps the public up to date on biological science issues affecting our world and affecting public policy.

Would you like to network with other students in the biological sciences? You can join the AIBS Facebook group for students in biology. 

AIBS is yet another organization echoing what National University has said all along: Career prospects in the biomedical and biological sciences are growing and can be found in a diverse range of industries.

 

Meet Biomedical Science Student Konstantina Adams

Konstantina Adams knew NUHS was her dream school after visiting the campus on a high school anatomy tour.  In this video she shares her favorite aspects of the BS program, as well as her experience in on-campus housing. Konstanina plans to use her bachelor's degree in biomedical science as a foundation for a future career in chiropractic medicine.


"You're being taught by professors who actually care and who are part of the field that you are eventually going into. I've been taught by chiropractors, I've been taught by naturopaths...people who are passionate about what they're teaching." -- Konstantina Adams, biomedical science student