Archive for tag: careers

How to choose a science career and set goals

With a bachelor of biomedical sciences degree, you can pursue a long list of lucrative career options in science. How do you choose which is right for you?

Screen Shot 2017-11-30 At 2.55.18 PMAccording to career experts, making these decisions early on and creating a game plan to achieve your career aspirations are important to finding success, particularly in the field of science.

If you're still undecided, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has an interactive tool that can help you narrow down some options and map out a strategic plan. 

Created by scientists, AAAS's Individual Development Plan (IDP) provides exercises that help examine your skills, interests and values. Based on this information, the program will select individualized careers from 20 different science-related options. The program will also help you identify preferred and alternative career paths.

Once you've chosen a career path, IDP will guide you in setting goals for the upcoming year with optional reminders. It's a great way to get a head start on any career in science.

Interested in exploring other careers options with a bachelor of biomedical sciences degree? You can also find a list of career options on our Future of Integrative Health blog or on the NUHS website.

 

Discover a new online resource for careers in science

If you're considering a career in biomedical sciences, it's important to stay up to date with evolving trends in the science industry. 

Student On GrassThe journal Science, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), has an online news center with a special science career section. This resource can be especially useful for finding career tips and learning more about the industry as a whole.

The site includes a variety of information on workforce issues, professional development and career-related policy. For example, a recent article on the site discusses the National Institutes of Health's Early Stage Investigator (ESI) Policy and how it is helping young scientists receive more grant funding.

You can also find columns written by practicing scientists with practical tips on how to have a successful career in science. There are a variety of career options for biomedical science graduates.  If you're wondering how many biomedical science jobs are available today, a job search tool allows you search for all new positions related to science. 

For example, we put the term "research" into the search engine and pulled up 1,365 job listings in scientific research from around the world. There's also a library of employer profiles, so that you can get to know some of the larger employers in the science industry.

You can even open an account on the site, post your resume, and get up-to-date job openings emailed to you. Your account allows you to make your resume and profile available to headhunters and employers in the science industry.

This site will help you imagine all the opportunities you'll be able to explore with your bachelor's degree in biomedical science from National University.

Pathway to a career in health care

Over half of the  "100 Best Jobs" are in health care, health care support or science, according to U.S. News & World Report. So while a career in health care is a no-brainer, a bigger challenge is choosing the specific profession that's right for you. How and where should you pursue the required education? What kind of career opportunities will there be? These can be daunting questions for anyone.

Teachers And Student With MicroscopeIf you're considering a career in health care, your undergraduate degree in biomedical sciences can be a great place to start. This degree puts you on the path toward a career in health care. While you're completing your degree, you can continue to explore your next health care move.

At National University, you will be at the same campus as students who are earning their advanced degrees in several health care fields. This type of environment will allow you to explore your options much more in-depth.

You can choose from graduate programs in chiropractic medicine (DC), naturopathic medicine (ND) and oriental medicine (MSOM) and acupuncture (MSAc). With more Americans choosing complementary and alternative medicine treatments (about 4 in 10, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), it is an exciting field to be in. An additional advantage is that Bachelor of Biomedical Science students at NUHS can save up to a year off their education by combining a BS with either a DC or an ND degree.

You also have the option of earning your doctor of chiropractic (DC) degree from our Florida site. National University's program is offered at the St. Petersburg College located near Tampa Bay, an area experiencing some of the highest demand for health care workers, according to ABC News.

National University's BS degree is an excellent gateway to a prospering career in healthcare. Contact Undergraduate Admissions Counselor Deb Cascio at dcascio@nuhs.edu or (630) 889-6577 to learn more. 

Need more reasons to complete your Bachelor of Science degree?

A bachelor degree in Biomedical Science, such as the one offered at National University of Health Sciences, provides many future career options, including in the field of health care. 

Here are some reasons why you might want to complete your degree in BS.

  • 28 out of the U.S. News & World Report 2016 "100 Best Jobs" are in health care, health care support or science.
  • A 2014 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that those with a bachelor's degree can expect to earn $1.2 million more from the ages of 22 -- 64 than someone with just a high school diploma.12016-09-30_lab
  • STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), health, and business majors are the highest paying, leading to average annual wages of $37,000 or more at the entry level and an average of $65,000 or more annually over the course of a recipient's career.2
  • Entry-level college-educated workers aged 21-14 with Health Majors earn a median of $41,000 annually. For ages 25-59, this jumps to $65,000 annually.3
  • Median annual wages of college-educated workers with biology and life sciences majors (ages 25-50) $56,000.4
  • Georgetown University projects 5.6 million jobs in the healthcare sector by 2020, 82% of which will require postsecondary education.5

Visit National University and explore how completing your bachelor's degree in biomedical sciences on our campus can open more doors in your future. Call the Office of Admissions at 1-800-826-6285 or email admissions@nuhs.edu for more information.

Sources:

1: 2014, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

2,3,4,5: 2015, The Economic Value of College Majors, Georgetown University

What’s in a Major? Plenty!

Campus Visit Day FLAre you still wondering if a bachelor in biomedical science degree is the right degree for you? If you are seeking strong earning potential, it sure is.

Georgetown University issued a report in 2015, which tracks income data for college graduates from various majors. Some of the report findings indicate that an undergraduate degree in a health or science field, such as biomedical sciences, can lead to higher paying careers, even without a graduate degree.

Here are some of the earnings data found for undergraduate science and health majors:

  • STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), health, and business majors are the highest paying degrees, leading to average annual wages of $37,000 or more at the entry level and an average of $65,000 or more annually over the course of a recipient's career.
  • Entry-level college-educated workers aged 21-24 with health majors earn a median of $41,000 annually. For ages 25-59, this jumps to $65,000 annually.
  • The median annual wages of college-educated workers with biology and life sciences majors (ages 25-50) is $56,000

Georgetown University also projects 5.6 million jobs in the healthcare sector by 2020, 82% of which will require a postsecondary education.

Come explore how easy it is to finish your bachelor's degree in biomedical science at National University of Health Sciences. Plan a visit to campus anytime from now through August 2016 and receive a tuition incentive of $500 for your first trimester in the B.S. program, through the NUHS Summer Soak Up offer.

(source: 2015 The Economic Value of College Majors, Georgetown University)