Archive for tag: licensure

Things Are Moving Forward

"I should be asleep." This is what I say to myself at hours like this -- around O-dark-thirty when I'm still up working on something. "I should be sawing logs or whatever people are supposed to be doing at this hour... instead I'm here."

This last week has been a week for the record. I finished my master's degree. I don't know how I did it -- but I did it. I honestly don't know how I worked, had any part in my kids' lives, was full-time here at National, and full-time at Western States. But I did. And now it's over. I haven't quite come down from it all just yet -- but the moment I realized I didn't have anything left to do, my head kind of dropped. While most people would be ecstatic, I was sullen. What do I do now? Now, granted -- I have absolutely no shortage of things to do, read, study, learn, attend, aspire to, whatever. But no one is making me -- but me.

On Friday of last week, I also sent in my paperwork for my Oregon license. And all last week, when I wasn't studying for or taking master's finals, I was working on the bridge course to be able to sit for the licensing exam, which takes place the day after graduation. In all of my "down" time, all I could think to myself was -- what am I going to do now? Where am I going to go? What am I going to do? I have to find a job. I have to move. I have to...

Sometimes we get so busy that all we do -- is do. And as those old parts of my mind started to wander back in, you know, the parts that think about stuff -- I started to get more and more scared. This is it. Things are happening. Things are actually happening.

Grey came back from Orlando, where he was competing in the FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America) state competition (He won 5th in his category -- which is kinda a big deal). He told me a story that made me cry -- in the middle of the grocery store. He told me about this guy -- Alex Sheen, who spoke at the FBLA ceremony with thousands of high school kids from all over the state. Grey said that there was barely a dry eye in the place. And I can see why. Alex started the organization "because I said I would." Here's his story:

It made me think about what promises I might make at this point in my life. I'm at such a point of transition -- finishing school, Grey going to college, moving across the country, starting a new profession...

In the quiet moments, at the clinic, we talk about what life will be like when we're not around each other anymore. We've spent nearly every day together for the last three and a half years. Even when we still had breaks in between trimesters we would often text or email each other, or sometimes hang out. I'd like to make a promise to my close classmates that I won't lose touch and completely disappear, as I'm apt to do.

Things are moving forward. Even though we might not all be in the same place, I hope that we move forward together. After all, we've been together so long that we're family.

Have a great week, everyone!

Week 4?

Week 4. What? How did that happen? Time is absolutely flying.

I feel like one of those time warp photos - you know the ones where someone stands still and everything passes them by 800 miles an hour. Just like this.

I feel like I just can't get everything done fast enough -- that the "to do" list keeps growing and growing, and as soon as I get things checked off, a million are piled up in its place. And yet, things keep getting checked off. We are now officially done filling out college applications for Grey. I've ordered my application for Oregon licensure. I'm nearly halfway done with this last quarter of the master's program, and I start at the VA next week.

I spent the last week, besides doing everything else, reading journal articles. I read 14 articles on various (potentially) controversial topics in nutrition: dairy, egg, whole grain, and meat consumption. It addressed cholesterol and eggs, lactose intolerance, dairy allergy, whole grains and cancer, and several other topics. But even after all of that, it was pro-ingestion. These papers were FULL of statistics. Each one loaded with numbers trying to support its case.

And then I looked at the lists of conflicts and references.

In Journal Club, we were taught to read everything with a critical eye, to see the potential conflicts, and judge the studies accordingly. For everyone that I talked to about these articles, my only comment was -- "Statistics can manipulated to support anything."

2015-02-05_dil

Always read with a critical eye. You never know what information might be valuable, and what might be... 87.

Have an amazing week, Everyone. And if you come across some good studies, feel free to send them my way.