Helping our veterans with massage therapy

UntitledDuring Veterans Day this month, the country honored and commemorated those who have served in the U.S. armed forces. But year-round at National University we are always looking for ways to help our veterans, particularly those with health issues.

One of our faculty members, Jerrilyn Cambron, DC, MPH, Ph.D., LMT, participated in a panel about massage in the military during the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Convention last month. The panel highlighted the benefits massage therapy can provide to veterans. 

A big health concern for many of our veterans is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Triggered by experiencing or seeing a terrifying event, the health condition can last months or years and result in a variety of symptoms including flashbacks, emotional numbing and anxiety.

According to Dr. Cambron, there are a few research studies indicating that massage therapy may be beneficial for the treatment of PTSD, particularly in veterans. Other studies demonstrating positive benefits have focused on massage therapy for anxiety and for pain, both of which are associated with PTSD, she said.

During the panel, Dr. Cambron and other experts also discussed that veterans may have different needs than other massage clients, especially those with PTSD. For example, they may have an aversion to touch on certain parts of their body or they may be uncomfortable lying in a dark room with their face down. Therefore, it's important for massage therapists to discuss certain needs with their clients who are veterans.

If you're looking for a career in which you can help our veterans, massage therapy may be the perfect choice. To learn more about the Massage Therapy Program offered at NUHS visit our website: www.nuhs.edu/admissions/massage-therapy.

To learn more about the free and discounted services provided to veterans at our Veterans Clinic in the Whole Health Center in Lombard call 630-629-9664 to schedule your appointment.

 

Celebrate National Massage Therapy Awareness Week with NUHS

As part of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) 20th annual National Massage Therapy Awareness week Oct. 23 - Oct. 29, massage therapists across the country are highlighting the benefits of massage therapy and encouraging others to incorporate massage into their personal wellness plans.

NUHS Massage Therapy faculty are currently celebrating at the AMTA 2016 National Convention in nearby Milwaukee. On Thursday, Jerrilyn Cambron, DC, LMT, MPH, Ph.D., chair of the College of Allied Health Sciences and Distance Education, will be presenting new research on massage therapy and pain. She will also be moderating a panel on massage therapy in the military.

Photo of woman receiving a massage

On Friday, NUHS MT students will attend Student Day where they will be able to connect with potential employers along with successful practitioners who will share their insights on networking, marketing and running a business.

In my previous blog post, I highlighted that the profession is expected to grow significantly in less than 10 years. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for massage therapists is projected to grow 23 percent by 2022, higher than the overall projected job growth of 10.8 percent.

With over 39.1 million people reported to have received a massage from July 2014 to July 2015, students are finding that the massage therapy profession can be a very successful one.

If you're interested in learning more about a career in massage therapy, explore the National University of Health Science's massage therapy program at an evening information night from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on November 16 at the Lombard campus.

At the event you can learn about the curriculum, explore career opportunities and talk with financial aid representatives. You can even talk with a graduate of the massage therapy program and get their perspective that a lot of prospective students find helpful.

Click here to RSVP and learn more.  

 

Massage Therapist is One of Top 10 Best Health Care Support Jobs

MT_Job Growth _with _labelThe health care support field is predicted to be one of the fastest-growing job segments in the next 10 years (Bureau of Labor Statstics).  U.S. News reviewed the nation's most in-demand occupations in their annual Best Jobs report and ranked massage therapist as #8 in the "Best Health Care Support Jobs" category for 2016.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects massage therapist employment growth of 23% between 2016 and 2024--higher than overall projected job growth of 10.8%.

In addition to job growth, the field of massage therapy offers many avenues to shape your career--from working at spas or fitness centers to working at hospitals, for sports teams, at integrative medical clinics, and more.

Careers _nocaptionsIf you've been considering Massage Therapy as a career, there's never been a better time to take the step forward!

A perfect opportunity for you to gain insight and learn about National University's convenient, one-year, evening certification program is through a Massage Therapy visit event.

When is the Massage Therapy Info Session?

  • Wed., Oct., 5, 2016 (6-8pm)
  • Wed., Nov. 16, 2016 (6-8pm)

How Do I Register?

*You will also get a  $250 tuition credit toward your first trimester for attending this event!*

Sign up for the next Massage Therapy Info Session and take the next step toward your future career.

You can also schedule an individual tour during the daytime if that is more convenient for you. Get started by calling 1-800-826-6285 or emailing admissions@nuhs.edu.

Before You Dive Into Massage School - Do These Three Things

Have you ever started a project but changed your mind or lost interest half way through? That's okay if you are knitting a scarf or cleaning out a closet. But if you're starting a massage therapy career education program, you want to be sure this is the right school and right career for you. With today's tuition costs, losing interest before you even graduate can be expensive.

2016-08-26_massage

That's why, even though you may be convinced massage therapy is a career you will love, it's good to be completely sure before you start. How can you be sure? Here are three important steps:

First: Get a Professional Massage

In fact, if you can afford it, get several massages over time with a variety of different massage therapists. Take time to talk with your massage therapists and see how they like their career. Look around at their work environment. Imagine yourself in their shoes, doing what they do, with lots of different people as your clients.

Second: Visit a Massage School

Don't just shop for a massage school online. It's best to actually visit the campus and see the facility. What looks good online might not be what you expected when you show up for your first class. Actually see the classrooms, the practice area, meet the faculty, and see where you'll be massaging clients in your internship phase.

Third: Choose a Program with a Trial or Intro Course

See if you can test out the program to see if it's for you. National University requires all students to complete a one-week Introduction to Massage Therapy course during the very first week of the first trimester. In the intro course, you'll learn the basics of massage therapy through lecture, demonstration and hands-on instruction. You must pass the course as a requirement to continue in the program. This helps you determine whether massage therapy is the right career choice for you.

National University is still offering its "Summer Soak Up" tuition incentive for anyone who visits campus before August 31st. By just visiting, you can earn $500 tuition credit for your first trimester. Call 1-800-826- 6285 or email admissions@nuhs.edu for more details or to plan your visit.

Pain Medicine Journal Explores Massage Therapy

PainMassage Therapy is getting lots of attention as an effective tool for pain.  Pain is a major public health concern that affects approximately 100 million Americans. Chronic pain accounts for 80% of physician visits and almost $600 billion in annual health care expenditures and lost productivity.

A leading scientific journal, Pain Medicine, recently published a series of research articles on the effectiveness of massage in reducing pain for a variety of conditions, including cancer and post-surgical pain.

Dr. Jerrilyn Cambron, a professor at National University of Health Sciences who co-authored the journal series, says: "These articles will go a long way in promoting massage therapy as an evidence-based approach to pain management."

National University has always considered massage therapy an important part of a new trend in health care called "integrative medicine." If you are thinking about starting a career in massage therapy, it's good to be familiar with this word.  Why?

Integrative medicine is where health professionals from different fields work together, joining their unique skills in a group effort as they work to get patients better. So articles such as these that show how massage helps pain will also help show MDs, hospitals and pain management clinics when to call on massage therapists to assist them in treating pain patients.

Why not visit National University to learn more on how you can study massage therapy on a campus devoted to integrative medicine, with faculty like Dr. Jerrilyn Cambron and other leaders in the profession? If you visit now through August 31st, you'll be eligible for a tuition incentive of $500 during National University's "Summer Soak Up" program.