So You Want to Work on a Cruise Ship?

Working on a cruise ship sounds like a dream job, doesn't it?  Well, here's the scoop on how it all works.Cruise -large

According to Steiner TransOcean, an organization that manages and trains personnel for about half of the cruise ships running in the world, massage therapists are hired who have the qualifications to work in the United States. Therapists who are accepted are trained in the Elemis system of massage, which includes a specific product line of oils not available on land. The oils are used in a 75-minute massage that incorporates mind and body relaxation.

Two very important attributes to have:

A good attitude- They want smiling faces and genuine people. Their clients are on vacation and are there for a very positive experience.

The ability to sell- Therapists are expected to sell the Elemis products and a large part of their income depends upon their sales.

After sending in a resume and proof of your certification or licensure, you will be contacted by Steiner if they want you to appear for an initial interview and trial massage. These interviews are conducted on cruise ships when they are docked in U.S. ports, usually around Florida (at your expense).

Once accepted, you fly to London (at your expense) to complete training. Training lasts from two to 10 weeks depending on how qualified the therapist is and how quickly she/he catches on to the Elemis system. Steiner pays for lodging. Therapists are then flown to their assigned vessel.  From that flight on, Steiner picks up all expenses, including room and board, and the return flight home at the conclusion of the assignment. The length of assignments ranges from four to eight months.