Archive for tag: boston

Under the Gun - Ebola for Dinner

And we're back! We're really back, full-on, cramming for boards, prepping for patients and all. I'll admit it, the experience of preparing for boards has taken some wind out of my sails. Last trimester I was feeling ready to be a doctor. Spending time in the clinic made me feel ready to see patients and puzzle through the hard cases. More recently, I've been laboring with my 500-page board review book and feeling inadequate.

Thankfully, I can see that the deflation of my confidence comes in direct response to my anxiety about taking board exams. And I guess I am feeling slightly more capable after finishing the Cardio section yesterday and color-coding my weekly schedule this morning. Wrapping my head around a new schedule always takes at least a week, and getting it all organized definitely helps calm my mind.

Photo of schedule
Yeah, my color-coded schedule for Tri 7

Seeing as we celebrated Martin Luther King Day this week with Monday off (thank goodness, any extra study time is treasured!), I am inspired by this piece of wisdom he wrote:

"Darkness cannot drive out darkness, only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that."

In preparing for boards, it doesn't do much good to mix negativity with those dark, foreboding clouds floating around February 3rdon my mental calendar.... I'm trying hard to stay positive while I study and am thankful for the encouraging text messages I've been getting from my ND friends who are in the same boat.

Photo of shooting a pistol at firing range
JohnnyD instructing me in the fine art of shooting a pistol

As it turns out, even a 4-week break can't provide enough time to study as much as planned. I do have a few good excuses though.... My boyfriend Hanzi and I spent a week around Christmas in Northern Michigan with his family; we skied, caught up with some of Hanzi's old friends, and I learned how to shoot a pistol! (Hanzi's Dad is the manager of a local shooting club.)

After returning from Michigan we had a few days before we headed out to Boston to visit with my family. Our week in Boston was our first visit to my parents' new house (I wrote about their move in this post), and included pond hockey, dinner with college friends, and some quality girl time for me with one of my oldest friends. I was also lucky to spend a day working with my Mom at her Integrative Dermatology practice where she incorporates diet and lifestyle in the treatment of her patients. I had an absolute blast interviewing patients and prepping them for their visit with the doctor, though I found the electronic medical records a huge pain to navigate... things to look forward to I suppose....

Photo of man speaking at dinner event
Ebola dinner lecture, my view from my seat by the fire

In addition to working in her office, my Mom took me as her guest to an informational Ebola dinner (appetizing, huh?) hosted by the local chapter of the Massachusetts Medical Society. I ate yummy salad, roast beast, soup, and chocolate cake while learning about Ebola. The lecture compared the first known epidemic in the 1970s with the disease picture of today's outbreak. I met one semi-retired female doctor who practiced general surgery who seemed wholly uninterested in naturopathic medicine, and another practicing female GP who asked me to send her an email with information about what we naturopathic doctors do. How cool!

After spending time immersed in the conventional medical world, I am happy to be back at NUHS, working on becoming a confident doctor who can hold her own in the company of skeptical, old medical doctors. If that isn't inspiration to crush these board exams, I don't know what is! Back to the books now.... Welcome back everyone!

Examining Place - The Midwest

Ah, sigh. This weekend I finally got away into the outside world where the air is significantly different from here in Chicagoland. I took in gulps of fresh air and smiled. I experienced my first corn maze in the flat, flat Midwest and sat under a tree whose red leaves came drifting down into my lap as I chewed my apple brat. I ate a candy apple, but we didn't get to pick our own apples because we were a little too late in the season for that.


These past two weeks, for some reason, I've found myself answering questions about my life before medical school. People have been asking about the places I've lived and the cultures there. I'm quick to tell a story about places outside of the Midwest, so this weekend's little adventures served as a good tether to pull me back, and to examine my current place.

When I was studying non-fiction writing in undergrad, we often examined the concept of Place and wrote on the topic: what does it mean to be in a place, what makes a place yours, not yours, different, the same, why sit and become enveloped in this place now? It's a damn hard task, to sit patiently in place and observe it for what it is. This is especially difficult when your world moves so quickly and you are expected to work hard at attaining, achieving, getting there, making progress towards becoming a doctor.

Despite the rapid clip at which I am working to become a doctor, I try, try, try to slow down and observe this place, to take it in and notice the unique things. This weekend helped me to settle and gaze, to take in the flat farmland, to hug my boyfriend, to laugh with new friends, and to read through old physiology notes in order to refresh my memory and help me be more present in my current classes.


When you talk about the Midwest with anyone, they inevitably say something about how nice people are here. My initial experience with this Midwestern friendliness involved some confusion, seeing as I come from Boston, a place where nobody acknowledges anybody unless they definitely want to talk. When I arrived in Chicago, a stranger would smile and ask me, "How are you?" I inaccurately perceived this as an open invitation for a full conversation. Over the past two years of living here, I've learned that friendliness does not necessarily equate to a desire to have a conversation, they're just being kind, I guess. I'm still a little weirded out by this; if you ask me how I'm doing, I still look at you sideways to figure out if you actually want me to answer that question, or not. On the other hand, my rather immediate assumption to jump into conversation has served me well, and I've made friends with shop clerks at nearly every place I buy goods and services.

Right now, the Midwest is my home, though perhaps not my truest Place. Here in Chicago, I've had to stumble along trying to navigate the culture, and I finally feel that maybe I'm able to catch these Midwesterners in stride and keep up. I have learned so much about life in the heart of classic America by living here. My greatest adventures so far have been getting to know a place by living in it, participating in the community, and feeling out the social habits of the people there. From this perspective, it's no wonder I feel so slammed with new information; it's not just the study of medicine I've been trying to assimilate, but the Midwestern way of life as well.


So being in medical school is more than just your peers, your books, your lectures, and the other trappings of studying medicine. Many of us move to a new place to start this journey into medicine, and the culture of that new place also provides us with struggles and triumphs. If we can find the time to sit with our new place, in addition to our books, we'll learn more about the world, which will certainly make us better doctors, right?

On Community (and Chocolates for Breakfast!)

I went home. I flew in and out of Boston on my way to and from a wedding in the Adirondack Park in northern New York. My parents have 2 more weeks to pack before they move out of my childhood home, a place they have lived for the past 30 years. While the home itself is large and lovely, it is really the neighbors that make that place home.


On Sunday night we had our neighborhood grandmother, Mrs. Chris, over for apple pie to celebrate her 80-something birthday. She brought the remainder of a box of chocolates to share and when I asked if she had eaten the others for lunch, she giggled and replied, "Breakfast!"

The Hartnetts, our other neighbors, also came over to sing happy birthday and share dessert. You have to understand that all of this transpired over the course of about 15 minutes; my parents realized they had a pie to eat, Mrs. Chris popped her head in the door on her evening walk, I called my best friend Annie (living momentarily with her parents next door while she and her boyfriend wait for their new apartment to be ready), and within 5 minutes she and her family had walked the 100 yards from their front door to ours. And we had a little party!

After pie, Annie's boyfriend Drew helped my brother with his statistics homework, while Annie and I tried to come up with the perfect caption for the photo of Mrs. Chris and the birthday sparkler in her piece of pie.


This is the community I come from. It explains the high expectations I have for Home, wherever that place turns out to be. I know that Chicago is not my true Home, but while I am here, the NUHS community is serving and supporting me better than I ever imagined it would. I chat with my professors in the hallway and I see them at our botanical garden, on the train, and walking around campus. There is an online community too, on Facebook pages, where my fellow students and our professors post links to relevant articles and information about upcoming seminars, workshops, presentations and club meetings.

The recent improvements on campus at the library and the ongoing work in Janse are providing us with more places to congregate during downtime and create community on campus. You might think that 28 credits and all the work that goes into keeping current in all those classes would leave us little time to engage with our community, but it seems that all that work actually brings us together. We commiserate, we struggle together, and we experience success together. We are a small community of hard workers with similar goals and morals when it comes to healthcare. Some of us come from different states, some of us love Chicagoland, and some of us feel lost in this expansive city, but no matter your perspective on this place as Home, the NUHS community certainly offers a supportive community if you are willing to engage.