Archive for tag: boards

Milestones

The first A, the first D, the first B when you thought it was going to be an F. There are many milestones that all of us at NUHS experience. They are the turning points that stick in our minds and mostly serve to boost us when we occasion to remember them.

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In the beginning -- my tri 1 lab group

There's the bittersweet end of pathology with Dr. Khan, and the viscera final aka your last anatomy practical ever! The first practical in the TAC shaking in your dress shoes and sweating through both your nice shirt AND your doctor coat. Grading yourself on that first practice spine and extremities practical and realizing you failed only to pass it when it comes to the real deal a week later. The first time you watch Dr. Lou take her shoes and socks off and not miss a beat in delivering her lecture.

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My group & me after our last ever anatomy practical (photo from Teegan)

The first time you've ever thought of J.Lo and a plumber in the same context, and the first time your head jerks up because Dr. McRae just SHOUTED in lecture. The moment when you realize that the 3-compartment model actually kind of makes sense (maybe). There's the first splash or smear of cadaver fat on your lab coat, and the first time you realize you're actually super hungry in the middle of dissection lab. Experiencing your first adjustment and then the first time you get a cavitation when giving someone else an adjustment, yes! The first exam during which you notice your palms are not sweaty and you're actually breathing just fine. The first time you forget to return the markers to the library desk and you have to pay a silly amount in fines (and decide to buy your own markers.)

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My nametag milestone

There's the last time you have Dr. Ed for class, and the last time you sit through one of Dr. Humphreys' neuro-heavy lectures. The moment you realize that Dr. Richardson's stories just keep getting better, so you vow to pay attention and you learn tons of pharmacology in the process. And then you realize that Dr. Ed had Dr. Christiansen as a professor, too. The day you receive your official intern nametag to be worn at all times in the clinic. The first time you tie a tourniquet and choose a vein in phlebotomy lab, and the first time you see the red flash. The first draw you mess up that either makes blood squirt, your patient cry out, or leaves behind a little hematoma (whoops!)

And then there are the things I haven't experienced yet but that I anticipate -- the first patient in clinic, the last patient in clinic. The first colonics patient, the first real live constitutional hydrotherapy you administer in clinic. And before you get to the clinic, there's the first real live gyn exam and digital rectal exam on a sym patient. Then, there's the first actual real patient presenting for a gyn exam, or the patient who refuses to receive a treatment you really think would help. The first time a patient cries in the exam room. There will be the patient who must be told the less-than-favorable results of a blood test; the patient that keeps you up at night wondering if you said the wrong thing, or the right thing. There will be the patient who isn't responding to treatment, and the patient who comes in singing your praises.

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Officially registered for boards

And then there is this week's milestone; registering for the NPLEX Part 1 Biomedical Science Examination. I've long been thinking about February's exam, but registering today made it REAL. Honestly, it's almost too bad I couldn't have registered several months ago, as it would've brought that realness to life at the time when I should have started taking my preparation more seriously. Oh, and there's another recent milestone; watching that first video in the board review series and having your eyebrows permanently raised in anguish as you painstakingly extract basic biochemistry from the recesses of your brain. You must take several deep breaths to calm those nerves you thought you were done with after that exam when you noticed your palms weren't sweaty and your breathing was even.

I have A LOT of information to retrieve from the depths and bring back to the forefront of my memory by the first week in February. I'm totally anxious about it, and every time I sit down to study, I have to fight the urge to ditch it and do something else that doesn't make me feel quite so bad about myself. Lately, I've been reflecting on how far I've come in order to remember that all the basic science information is there; I DO own it. Writing this post has helped me continue that affirmation process, and I hope it's maybe done the same for you in some way... or maybe it made you smile or laugh, or perhaps it made you curious about what lies in store.

Go Us! Almost There!

Whoa, here we are! It's already my last post for the trimester, a sure sign we have only a handful of days left until we're done! Week 14 signals the beginning of exams with all the lab practicals taking place this week. My E&M Extremities practical on Monday has required me to learn and understand about 60 different types of orthopedic tests and 44 different types of mobilizations/manipulations/adjustments. Let's just say this is prime evidence of how medical school is like drinking from a fire hose.

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This trimester has been a significant one for me. I started the Clinical Sciences portion of my degree, made a decision on when to take boards, followed my intuition and decided to do a dual degree in massage, and learned so much from my sim-patients about what the real experience will be like. It was also the first trimester that I haven't had any classes with any of my best buddies with whom I started the program. This is a blessing and a curse because I miss their company terribly, but I have also made new friends who I value just as much. During this tri, I traveled to see some of my favorite people make the promise to spend their lives together, my best and oldest friend got engaged (I never told you this, ah!), I wrote a blog post here that elicited tears from an exceptional friend (the first time my written words have ever inspired such emotion), and my parents sold my childhood home. All this, and it still feels that these summer months have absolutely flown by!

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If you're not here at NUHS yet, you'll soon learn the value of our brief breaks between the trimesters. This time I will head east, and go on a 4-day backpacking/hut trip adventure in the White Mountains of New Hampshire with my family and Hanzi to celebrate my Dad's 60th birthday (wish us happy trails, we might need it!). After that, I plan to visit with some of my best college girlfriends; one of them just bought a house -- OMG -- grown-up things! Hopefully, I'll find a day to shadow my Mom at her Integrative Dermatology practice, and will crack my Boards study guide at some point (we'll see about that last one). I hope the rest of my peers also have something fun, and especially something relaxing, planned for break!

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But before we can totally engage with our time off, we have to give that last major push through finals. WE CAN DO IT! Remember, it's OK for life to be totally, completely unbeautiful right now. Also, the world is a whole lot bigger than NUHS finals week.

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Throughout my post is a series of photos I took around campus on the Friday before Week 14. I asked students to show me how the impending last 2 weeks of the tri makes them feel; this is what I saw. General consensus says we're all a little crazed, a little worn out, and a little hungry for the sweet stuff...so don't worry, here's the evidence that if this is how you feel, you're not alone!

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Lastly, a little blessing for us all; may our professors ask us the questions to which we have all the answers! Good luck, friends!

Walk the Talk

I told you all about me last week, which is good for foundation, but now I have to catch you up on what actually took place during my first week of the summer tri! 

My first week of classes in the Clinical Sciences phase was awesome. We are at the point now where we get to apply the information we've learned about how the body works to clinical situations; how a patient would present in clinic. So far I think GI & GU & Reproductive Systems is my favorite class. We talked about fascinating stuff like where the problem comes from if a patient in pain vomits or has black stool. I suppose only doctors and future doctors can be so enthralled with the color of poop and whether or not someone's going to vomit so as to make it their favorite discussion of the week. I must be in the right place!

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Digging around the NUHS botanical garden

I ended my first week of the trimester at the garden party on Friday evening.  Those of us who love to dig in the dirt or who want to learn more about medicinal plants meet at our modest botanical garden where we gather to pull weeds, laugh, review, and learn about the plants from our professor, Dr. Lorinda Sorensen. Thumbs up from my friend John who is as happy as I am to spend his Friday evenings diggin' in the dirt!

In contrast to our first week, this past week it rained. A lot. The lacrosse practice I usually coach was cancelled due to the chilly, wet weather. Despite this, I did manage to commute to school by train/bike on Thursday, and the rain held off just long enough!

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Lilacia Park in full bloom! It's located next to the train station in downtown
Lombard. I wandered through while waiting for the train to arrive. 

Mostly, I spent this rainy week struggling over whether or not to take the NPLEX Part I boards this August. I am eligible to sit for the exam now that I have completed the Basic Sciences phase. All the other ND schools have the summer off from classes (as far as I know), and many of their students study all summer long. Here at National, I am taking a full course load of 28 credits and the board exam falls during the week right before final exams. While I don't doubt that I COULD do it if I HAD to, the prospect of studying every free moment all summer long is unpleasant and intimidating.

It's decisions like these that make me realize the importance of walking the walk. As NDs we will advise our patients to optimize the determinants of health -- adequate sleep, hydration, community support, and healthy food -- to name a few. It is a true challenge to live the life of a student and embody naturopathy at the same time. My conclusion has been to take the board exam in February. This decision comes after listening to the advice of upper tri students, and also by listening to my own heart. In doing so, I'm embracing the reality of what it takes for me to stay happy and healthy, all the while keeping my eyes on the prize: McKenzie Mescon, ND.