On Finding Your Favorite Tools

I'm deciding whether or not to study Massage Therapy while I'm here at National in addition to getting my ND. Many of my peers get dual degrees, whether it be ND/DC or ND/AOM because the modalities and philosophies run in parallel and allow us to expand our scope to meet our interests and passions, especially in unlicensed states. Part of the adventure of studying naturopathic medicine is learning what aspects of our vast toolbox suit you best, and then exploring ways to pursue those interests.

I struggled for a few weeks last fall with whether or not to enroll in the AOM program, because Chinese medicine is so wise and its application is so broad and increasingly accepted by mainstream medicine. It serves as an excellent adjunct to naturopathic medicine. Many of our professors use it. Ultimately though, I realized I do not absolutely, definitely, no question, want to be a master of Chinese medicine in the kind of way I know I want to be a naturopathic doctor. And, I am not willing to invest all the time and money in something that doesn't feel quite right for me.

2014-06-17_em
In E&M Extremities class, Meg demonstrates a gait anomaly as the rest of us analyze it.

Over the past few trimesters, I have gravitated towards physical medicine in application with naturopathic medicine. I was totally surprised when I enjoyed E&M class and found that I was actually pretty good at adjusting. I realized that I know my body and its relationship to weight-bearing and careful maneuvering through my experience of being a competitive athlete. It's been years since I gave up competitive sports in college, but I still have that knack for acquiring muscle memory and fluidity in movement, and it pays off in understanding how the body should, or wants to, move.

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Cranial Sacral Massage elective class with our professors,
Dr. Patricia Coe and Dr. Heather Wisniewski

Also, having never taken any kinesiology classes, I figured I was doomed when it came to grasping biomechanics. As it turns out, knowing my body and its movements has made learning biomechanics and adjusting a lot easier. Inspired by my propensity for understanding and applying physical medicine, I asked for a recommendation of who to talk to or what other avenues to explore beyond the classroom. Dr. Pearson, one of the family practice interns, directed me to Dr. Coe, massage program supervisor and instructor (and totally awesome ND/DC/MT/photographer/character/mentor). I signed up for her massage elective class on Cranial Sacral technique and discovered this awesome new dimension to add to my ND toolbox. By using what I learned in Dr. Coe's class, I continue to study through experience on my friends and fellow classmates. I am learning how to listen with my hands, follow what I find, and make people feel better.

Inside Outside Muscle Hand by Katherine Du Tiel
"Inside/Outside: Muscle/Hand" San Francisco, 1994. Photograph.
U.S. National Library of Medicine. Katherine Du Tiel (b. 1961) [artist]

So, in an effort to distract myself from the stress of 3 exams and 2 assignments due in the upcoming days, I've tracked down Dr. Coe and picked her brain on my options for adding the Massage Therapy coursework.

I also reached out to a recent NUHS grad who tutored me through Phase 1 and studied in the massage, chiropractic and naturopathic programs during her time here at National. She offered some solid advice. (Even after they're gone from campus, NUHS folks are still accessible and willing to help you!) Now I have to make some decisions. It's probably time to make a pros and cons list and a phone call to Mom and Dad, who always offer pretty good advice. Part of what makes naturopathic medicine so strong is this great big toolbox we're given. It also presents a fun challenge to us students: to discover our strengths and trust the process!