Archive for tag: pets

Entrance and Exit Exams

This is the time of the trimester when many students are heavily engrossed in studying--this week is entrance and exit exams. As mentioned in previous blogs, three sets of students take entrance and exit exams: 

  • Students who have fulfilled all their clinical observation responsibilities and first year coursework take internship entrance exams. This is typically an exciting time, as after successful completion of the entrance exams, these students become interns in the NUHS clinic.
  • The second set of entrance exams occurs after the intern has fulfilled at least one year of clinical internship along with their coursework. At this junction, the student/intern takes senior entrance exams.
  • Graduating students also take exams this week. The graduation exams are exit exams. They help the student and school gauge how much information the student has retained since beginning their AOM education at NUHS.

2012-11-14_books

The initial entrance exam includes testing over point location and theory, foundations of AOM, biomedicine, and a practical exam. The senior entrance exam includes a more advanced version of exams covering those subjects. Additionally, these students are tested in herbology. The exit exam includes all the subjects the senior entrance exams include, but omits the practical portion.

This week I am taking the graduation exit exams. I feel that preparing for these exams is helping me to prepare for taking my board exams. I feel the exit exams are insightful in showing me how much I have learned and retained, how prepared I am for my board exams, and as a way of reminding myself of things I may have forgotten. I find this preparation is very useful for my clinical work as well. Reviewing all the material since beginning at NUHS is helping me rediscover information I had forgotten. As a result, it's helping me re-expand the application of this information clinically.

2012-11-14_cat

As shown in previous blogs, I have two adorable cats that enjoy helping me study.  Typically they let me know when it's time for a study break, as shown in the picture above.

Thank you for reading my blog this week. I hope you make this a great week!

AOM and Pets

For several years I have been reading about and learning how apply acupressure and other forms of AOM on my pets, without using needles. Recently, I have been reading more on how to understand and apply this form of care for animals. My pets have always responded in a very positive manner, which continues to inspire me to learn more about these practices.

While I feel I am a complete novice when it comes to applying acupressure to animals, I thought it would be fun to share some pictures and experiences of using it on my pets.

2012-02-21_cat 1a

My cats seem to love receiving acupressure and Tui Na. Tui Na is a form of Chinese medical massage. It works with balancing yin and yang and restoring healthy qi flow.

2012-02-21_cat3

My grey striped cat Rosie, shown in the pictures, has had digestive upsets since birth. As a result, I have treated her primarily with Healing Touch (a form of chakra based energy work), Tui Na, and acupressure. She has always found relief with these treatments. They appear to remove digestive blocks and imbalances. Now, whenever she appears a bit bloated, she sachets over to my feet, lies down, and rolls on her belly to be massaged!

As you can see from the pictures, both my cats enjoy receiving massages and acupressure from the pink Chinese massager. The massager is actually a human head and neck massager on one end and acupressure roller on the other end.

2012-02-21_cat4

One day when Rosie's abdomen was rather distended, I decided to use it on her abdomen and various acupressure points to see if it would help her and if she would tolerate it. She appeared to enjoy it from its first application with very positive results. Her distention went down and other gastric symptoms she had been displaying stopped. The cats then inherited the massager.

2012-02-21_cat5

I notice after I use various forms of needle-free AOM on my pets, they are much more playful and relaxed. I am forever fascinated by all the ways AOM can be applied and offer true results!

2012-02-21_cat2