Archive for tag: tcm

Essential Oils or Chinese Herbs

Are essential oils (EOs) the answer to the challenging questions of how to locate, transport, store, and prepare Chinese herbs? I'm starting to think so. The more I use EOs in everyday life, in everything from cleaning my kitchen floor to healing skin wounds, and even to give my beer that summery citrus flavor, the more I see the large overlap between EOs and Chinese herbs.

2014-07-28_booksAs a student of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (AOM), mostly derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), I respect and value the efficacy of a freshly decocted batch of raw Chinese herbs. I know they work, I've gained a basic understanding of why they work, but I struggle with the practicality of using them either for my family now or for a future patient population.

What are these challenges? First, there are a lot of "herbs" in TCM's Materia Medica (book of medical substances, whether plant, animal, or mineral derived). To stock a shoebox-sized amount of just most of them would require a very large storage room. Some need to be refrigerated, some need to be pulverized just prior to use, and some are illegal to use in the United States. No rhinoceros horn for you!

2014-07-28_shelvesFinding them--even the legal ones--presents yet another stumbling block. Should you order online, feign condition after condition to cache all the prescribed herbs you can squeak out of your clinician at school? Drive to Chinatown and take a stab at which shop has fresh, safe and affordable herbs? Sure enough, within a few days of making each trip to Chinatown myself I realize, "DOH! Now I need that other herb, too!" Back in the car....

After a year or so of engaging in this disorderly and expensive game of cat and mouse, I'd tried all (well, most) of these tactics--even growing some of my own! All legal, of course. Think "mint," not "ephedra." So, what's an AOM student to do? For the past year, this one's been exploring the way that high-quality EOs could fulfill many of the same needs as our Chinese herbs. How? Well, I'm not entirely sure that the properties translate exactly, but many sure seem to do just that. Let's take a look at our good friend, peppermint.

peppermint plantChinese name: Bo he. Common English name: Field Mint. Latin name: Mentha piperita. Same plant...same medicinal properties? I argue "yes." Most basically, peppermint is "cold" in nature. Both West and East agree on that. TCM goes on to add other attributes such as aromatic, acrid, and thus capable of dispelling the common wind-heat invasion (think: yellow snot and sore throat). My western manual of EOs describes peppermint as "anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and invigorating," with primary uses including "congestion, fever, influenza, heartburn." Sounds...pretty...similar!

Sure, the harvesting, processing, and distillation processes change, emphasize, or even exclude some of the chemical constituents, and the final usable product of dried bo he differs greatly in appearance from the bottle of peppermint EO. Does that mean they function differently, though? I used to harvest, dry, and lightly decoct my own bo he when I felt a wind-heat invasion coming on. It worked, as long as I was at home with my own garden and had some time to prepare it all. Lately, I've been easily reaching into my oils cabinet and tapping two drops of peppermint EO into a mug of warm water. Instant peppermint tea? Definitely. Instant medicinal answer to a wind-heat invasion? I say yes again, based on my own experiences.

2014-07-28_peppermintI'm not a chemist or a doctor, but in my experience and increasingly informed opinion, I'm finding that EOs can make a handy substitute for Chinese herbsin many cases. As with raw herbs, quality is of upmost importance when selecting an EO company. Storage, convenience and ease of use are all in favor of EOs, but they are limited in number. I haven't found one called "gecko" or "scorpion," or especially "Bear Gall Bladder," all of which are clutch entries in a TCM Materia Medica.

Conclusion: If you can manage to live and treat without the more exotic or illegal Chinese herbs, then EOs might be a practical substitute much of the time. Imagine the difference between handing a patient a bag full of raw ingredients, a pictorial instruction sheet, and a handshake full of hope that they can execute the cooking process effectively vs. handing the patient a small bottle of EO and the simple instructions to put two drops into a mug of warm water.

Extra considerations abound; this post cannot attempt to cover every angle or offer every comparison point. Granule or patent pills can make Chinese herbs more practical, while some EOs are quite expensive to purchase. Frankincense can easily run $100 per 15 ml bottle. Hey, if it's good enough for the Christ Child, you're going to have to pay up! There are also some pesky mind-blocks when trying to move seamlessly from one medical paradigm to the other. How could a TCM practitioner possibly use hot cinnamon bark and clove bud for a yellow-snot, sore throat sinus infection? Yet, that's exactly what the EO prescription is in that case. Homeopaths have no qualms with the theory of treating heat with heat, but that's not the plan in AOM!

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For now, I'll chalk this entire idea up to just another piece of evidence that an integrated approach to healthcare is truly the best option. Taking what works from any and all medical systems offers our patients the most options for being well. I'm open to that...

How Salads and Evil Qi Can Make You Gain Weight

How could salads cause weight gain? If you have Damp-Cold and you're trying to lose weight by eating cold, raw, veggie salads, you might not shed the pounds. "How can this be?" everyone is now screaming -- probably silently, that's fine. I thought eating lots of spinach, topped with radish, cucumbers, celery, etc. was supposed to help melose weight.

For some people, this might be an effective strategy, particularly if you are swapping out fast-food double cheeseburgers in favor of homemade veggie salads. Certainly, there is the undeniable benefit of increasing the nutrition you're taking in by adding more produce to your diet. I'm sure we all know someone who started eating more salads and less junk food and fairly promptly dropped a few pounds. Great.

So, why doesn't it work for everyone? In fact, why does eating all raw, cold veggie salads even have the possibility of causing weight gain in some people?

No, the answer is not about the dressing that you put on the salad! That would be too easy, not eastern-medicine-related, and frankly, it would probably cast a dark shadow on my consistently whole-fat dietary lifestyle approach.

Instead, my point here is related to one of TCM's six evil qis -- technically, two of them. I used the terms "cold" and "damp" earlier, and this is one of those special moments when normal, everyday words take on more specific meanings in the context of Chinese medicine. I think we call that "connotations." In TCM, Cold and Damp have pathogenic connotations.

A person can be constitutionally Cold or Damp from the get-go, or a person can be invaded by a Cold or Damp external pathogenic factor (actually called an "evil (xieh) qi"). Foods are like people; each food has specific properties, such as Cold, Hot, and whether the food leads to damp retention or drying out in the person who ate it.

In the case of a Cold, Damp person trying to lose weight, we need more hot, drying, acrid foods, and fewer raw, cold, damp foods on the plate. If this seems counter-intuitive, keep in mind that there are plenty of healthy, nutritious foods that have hot and acrid properties. Ginger and peppers, anyone? Yes, please.

What is your favorite food doing for you--or to you? My favorite book on nutrition, Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition, goes into detail on the connections between your diet and your health. Or, quickly check out the properties of some common fruits, veggies, meats, etc. here: http://www.tcmecc.org/foodtherapy.htm

Choose wisely, my friends.

Is Chinese Medicine Better than Western Medicine?

Is Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) better than conventional western medicine? Would a provider of oriental medicine and one of the ayurvedic traditions treat a patient the same way? Do naturopaths diagnose the same medical conditions as chiropractors do? 

The answer to each of these questions is probably a solid "sometimes."

2014-02-04_booksThe point is that one medical system is not necessarily better than another. Each of the above-mentioned categories exist as an entire medical paradigm, complete with its own unique way of diagnosing and treating an array of health-related issues. Did you know that your chiropractor could give you a pelvic exam, ladies? Did you know that your naturopathic doctor could give you a spinal adjustment? And what about those herbs? Why do western naturopaths have a different materia medica than we students of oriental medicine do? Is slippery elm awesome? I'll never know. And neither did the ancient Chinese, because it didn't grow there.

We've all heard that there is competition between the students, all graduating in Lombard at the same moment, as they get dumped out into a market that becomes more and more saturated every day. We all feel it from time to time -- a student of acupuncture who assumes her classes are 10,000 times more difficult than that of the massage student down the hall; the chiropractic intern who thinks he's way more important than any acupuncturist in the clinic; or the naturopath who points out that she can do everything a chiropractor can do and more!

Are they all right? Or are we all just egotistical jerks? Again, the answer is an unreassuring "sometimes."

2014-02-04_elmWhat I'm learning at NUHS is the unmistakable value of the various medical systems. My friends ask me if I scrape my tongue daily or if I've dabbled in oil pulling. No and no, I tell them. That's from the ayurvedic traditions of India, not the ancient Chinese medicine that I'm studying. Does that mean I don't think these practices have merit? Nope. I'm sure they do...I'm just not learning about them in my program. I've actually tried oil pulling, but I'm fairly certain I did it wrong, and I swallowed, which I learned later defeats the point. Whoops. I also love essential oils, and I frankly have no idea which tradition claims them.

What are we learning in the MS in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program at NUHS? I've memorized hundreds of acupoints -- well, a good chunk of them anyways -- and dozens of Chinese herbs, I finally realized that ginger and garlic are making it worse when I have a heat invasion, and I'm piecing together why a point on my inner wrist is so helpful for my heart palpitations. I finally learned how to spell "ayurvedic," and I hope I can pronounce "naturopathy" correctly most of the time these days.

2014-02-04_herbsMore importantly, I'm also learning that the "competition" chatter has a much bigger bark than bite. We students of oriental medicine like you students of chiropractic, naturopathy, and massage therapy, and I feel fairly confident assuming that you guys like us, too. In fact, the sheer number of students who dual enroll in more than one program at NUHS proves this point for me.

I value what the other practices and traditions bring to the overall health and well-being of the patient. I don't expect that I'll offer a patient the same knowledge and services that an ND or an MD does; I'll offer them something almost entirely different in fact. And that, my friends, is the point. We have a better shot at helping people if we work together, value each other's contributions and specialties, and keep an open mind to things that might sound crazy at first. Energy crystals...what?!

I See Tongues

Tongue DiagramIt's already second nature. When I see people, I see tongues. I notice when the actor in the movie on the big screen has a thick white coat. I try to sneak a peek at my friends' tongues when we're having a casual conversation. If there's a thick yellow coat, I subconsciously take a step back and continue our conversation from a safer distance. I've actually had dreams about analyzing someone's tongue shape, size, color, and coat.

Why am I haunted by tongues? As a student of acupuncture and oriental medicine, I've taken classes on how to evaluate various tongue appearances and use that valuable, albeit gross, information when formulating a diagnosis about the patient's overall condition. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the tongue and pulse are integral pieces in the puzzle of health and wellness.

The 2,000 year-old classic "Huang Di Nei Jing", translated as "The Yellow Emperor's Inner Cannon," offers around 60 quotes about the tongue. We are instructed to examine the exterior, including the orifices, in order to gain a clear picture of the interior. Specifically, the tongue can reveal problematic areas or functional systems within the body, such as stagnated Liver Qi or an accumulation of dampness. Not everyone in oriental medicine relies on the "stick out your tongue" method when diagnosing patients, though. Different practitioners place a varying amount of importance on the tongue's appearance. One professor even told us to treat the tongue appearance as a "tie breaker" if you are wavering between two diagnoses.

As a result, we students study the tongue diligently, searching for heat prickles, digging for signs of sublingual dilation. If we see a thick tongue with a white coat and scalloped edges, we feel fairly confident suggesting that the patient suffers from Spleen Qi deficiency. If you see a purple tongue with ventral dilation that gives you nightmares of giant black caterpillars crawling towards you, then you check into the patient's Liver Qi stagnation issues. Unfortunately, what you see in the average person's mouth is a combination of every diagnosable characteristic you've ever learned. In other words, it's not as easy as it sounds!

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I'll leave you with this tongue conversation that I had today with my 3-year-old son. Yes, even toddlers are getting in on the trend of diagnosing tongues these days! Enjoy...

Me: Let me see your tongue, buddy. (I look at the normal beautiful tongue that only children seem to have.) Thanks, it looks pretty good!

Him: Thanks, Mom. Show me your tongue now. (I stick out the mess that we adults always seem to have.) Whoa! Yours looks bad. It looks like a pirate ship... with windows... and people... and a volcano... and some beds! 

Go ahead...check out some tongue info here: http://www.sacredlotus.com/diagnosis/tongue/