Archive for tag: nutrition

Olive Oil, Cancer, and Apparently My Frustrations

Hot olive oil is carcinogenic. I'm trying to cut to the chase in my writing -- can you tell?

2015-02-11_oilWhen extra virgin olive oil is heated to its smoke point of around 300º Fahrenheit, bad things happen. Its protective anti-oxidants become cancer-causing free radicals. I know, I know...bring on the cop-out onslaught of "Everything causes cancer, there's no point in worrying about it." Wrong. That's the answer given by two groups of people, and (spoiler alert) you don't want to be in either group.

2015-02-11_butterFirst, and more acceptable, is the group of people who really haven't looked into health and nutrition at all. OK, hey, this is a diversified society. Not everyone has to be an expert in every subject. Some people can grow the food, others can study chemistry, and some can sell the apples at the market. It's 2015, as Tricia would say. You're a productive member of society, but you're busy. I know. You see a commercial saying "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter is a healthy choice," you run out and buy it, and you figure you're doing a decent job in life. Well, you're wrong. At minimum, really though, shouldn't every adult eater in America take a few minutes out of the upcoming "dancing with famous people" show and perhaps start to learn a bit about what you're putting into your body?

Secondly, and less acceptable, is the group of people who simply don't care about what they've learned. These are the people who read the same books about olive oil that I did, saw the explanations about why it's a bad idea to heat olive oil in your wok on stir-fry night, but keep doing it anyways. "Everything causes cancer, so why should I bother switching to a healthier option?" Gee, I don't know, maybe because you don't want to be on the wrong side of "1 in 2 American men will get cancer in his lifetime." Ladies, you're 1 in 3. Want specifics? Here's the full wheel of fun: Lifetime Probability of Developing or Dying from Cancer.

Here's a thought that not many people seem to care about. Not everything causes cancer. There are actually lots of things that don't seem to cause cancer. What about trying some pesticide-free vine-ripened fruits and vegetables? Maybe refrain from spraying yourself down in poison perfume every day? I'm not saying you can simply walk through life making all the right choices and be guaranteed cancer free. I am saying that there's this whole thing called "epi-genetics" that effectively blows out of the water the old lazy assumption that your genes have predetermined whether or not you will get cancer or be obese, etc. Not true. Your genes throw you into the world with a certain set of probabilities, such as a 30% risk that your breast cancer switch will be flipped on. Sure, that sucks, but it's not a death sentence.

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What can you do about it? Something! Epi-genetics reminds us that our lifestyle matters just as much, or more, than our genetic predeterminations. "Only 5-10% of all cancer cases can be attributed to genetic defects, whereas the remaining 90-95% have their roots in the environment and lifestyle. The lifestyle factors include cigarette smoking, diet (fried foods, red meat), alcohol, sun exposure, environmental pollutants, infections, stress, obesity, and physical inactivity." Nobody hates that alcohol part more than I do, believe me, but the overall point is still valid.

This was supposed to be about olive oil, wasn't it? Well, now you know why I don't cook with olive oil. I cook with organic, grass-fed butter, and my husband prefers coconut oil, both of which have higher smoke points than olive oil does, meaning that we can cook at higher temperatures more safely. Some of you will google this "hearsay" and find websites that say not to worry about it, because all cooking of all food breaks down nutrients and produces some free radicals, and your body is programmed to deal with that small amount of carcinogens. You'll be fine...probably. Really? How's that working out for you? Which group of the "1 in 2 Americans" do you think you're in? Clearly, friends, we are bombarding our bodies with way too many carcinogens these days.

YOUR CHOICES MATTER. Make some.

Anand, P., Kunnumakara, A. B., Sundaram, C., Harikumar, K. B., Tharakan, S. T., Lai, O. S., ... Aggarwal, B. B. (2008). Cancer is a Preventable Disease that Requires Major Lifestyle Changes. Pharmaceutical Research, 25(9), 2097-2116. doi:10.1007/s11095-008-9661-9

Check Your Chamber Pots, Ladies

2015-01-29_potEver heard of "bedpan bullets?" If you take a multivitamin from the grocery store shelf, odds are high that your body is not absorbing the vitamins and minerals listed on the side of the bottle. Nurses have been finding mostly-intact tablets in the bedpans of patients for years, sometimes so undissolved that the popular brand name is still legible!

How could this be true? How could my beloved multivitamin, that I've watched TV commercials for thousands of times, be a total waste of money? I checked the side of the bottle! It says it's giving me 100% of my daily need for Niacin. What could go wrong?

2015-01-29_bedpanWell, yes, you are popping a one-a-day that shows 100%s for most of your vitamins and minerals...but that does not mean that those nutrients are bioavailable. Your body is not absorbing nearly 100%, but instead, just shooting the tablet out your other end.

"Studies have shown individual vitamin isolates in supplements are about 10% absorbed. Compare this to vitamins directly from a fresh plant source, which are 77% to 93% absorbed. Minerals in a supplement are even worse -- 1% to 5%. But, from a plant source like raw broccoli, the minerals are 63% to 78% absorbable." Read more at HealthGuidance.org.

2015-01-29_pillsThe jig is up. In December 2013, the Annals of Internal Medicine published three papers on the health outcomes of regularly taking multivitamin supplements. Each concluded that it's essentially worthless -- and potentially dangerous -- to pop that multivitamin. The studies specifically looked at improvements in memory and cognition and reduction in rates of cancer and cardiovascular disease. The editorial explanation put out with these papers argued against taking them, stating, "Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified, and they should be avoided." Check out this article from ScienceBasedMedicine.org, which links to all 3 referenced papers and the associated editorial:

2015-01-29_tomatoSo what should a well-meaning, crappy American diet-eating individual do to fill in the obvious gaps in whole-food nutrition?

Most of us have a diet comprised of eating out or eating prepackaged factory foods. If you do step up and buy (conventional) produce and chow down on that, you're inundating your body with pesticides. Plus, your apple has probably irradiated to improve shelf life by destroying its vital energy. Unless you are eating an entirely organic, local, vine- or tree-ripened and immediately consumed diet of all fresh foods, your body almost certainly is not bringing in the vitamins and minerals that it needs (nor the digestive enzymes needed to use them). Even with my backyard garden, attempts to eat organic and local, and cooking from scratch almost daily, I'm sure I'm still all nutritionally holey as the ole slice of Swiss cheese.

2015-01-29_cheeseThe next best thing to the above mentioned beautiful diet is to look for a supplement that is whole-food based and bioavailable. I'll give you a clue--you probably won't find it on the sale aisle at the Jewel. Talk to your knowledgeable healthcare professional today about what type of supplementation is appropriate for your body and lifestyle. Dietary therapy and associated nutritional counseling is part of the Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program, as "food therapy" is one of the long-standing branches of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Who else can help? Your chiropractor and your naturopathic doctor also go through extensive education on supplements--ask one of us!

Does Wine = Exercise?

2014-11-21_wineCurious ladies are dying to know. Could the articles be true? Is drinking a glass of wine the health equivalent of working out at the gym? This. Is. Life-changing.

Here's the article: Resveratrol may be natural exercise performance enchancer - Science Daily. If you have a Facebook account, I'm sure you've at least seen the headline "Glass of Wine Equal to Hour at the Gym!" and the equally delighted personalized status updates by every woman and half the men you are "friends" with.

2014-11-21_chemSo, does the study actually prove this? Kind of. A team of researchers on the University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry found that resveratrol, a natural compound found in some fruits, nuts, and wine, mimics the effects of hard physical exercise on the human body. Although their conclusions leaned more towards creating a resveratrol supplement that could be given to patients that were unable to exercise -- such as a car accident victim with four broken limbs, I guess.

Naturally, the people did not stop there. Our lushy society has taken it upon ourselves to extrapolate the potential ways this could impact the average person. Can't make it to the gym tonight after all? No problem -- have a glass of wine! Don't feel like going for that run in the rain? Don't worry about it -- go back inside and drink wine!

2014-11-21_grapeWhat's the catch? There are a couple of details here. Again, their research was geared towards creating a performance-enhancing supplement, not a substitute for performance entirely. They said resveratrolmimicsthe results of endurance training...it's not quite as perfect in every way. Also, we are only talking about red wine here. "Why?" wonders the lady who only likes sweet dessert wines. The answer is that resveratrol -- the important part of the wine for this discussion -- is found primarily in the skin ofredgrapes. White wine just doesn't have the resveratrol levels that would make an impact in your big sea of body.

2014-11-21_glassWestern medicine always thinks it's discovering something new. Well...not this time, fellas! Chinese medicine has listed red wine as a therapeutic dietary choice for thousands of years. In TCM, red wine is dry and hot, so it expels dampness and warms the interior, expelling cold. Is that why I always crave a glass of Pinot Noir on a cold winter day?

The Chinese also use wine as a guiding element, directing other herbs or foods where the body needs those influences. They see wine as capable of moving blood and qi, which can help dispel not only cold but also stasis and stagnation of many types and manifestations. Both East and West recognize that red wine can improve circulation.

I'm not going to say that TCM wins again, but yes I basically am saying that TCM wins again. Let's compromise over a glass of red wine

My Salt, My Shen (and My SLEEP!)

2014-09-24_popcornI like to eat popcorn before bed at night...every night. I'm defended my position for years, so I'm ready for your attacks. No, I don't think it's bad for me. I air pop organic, non-GMO corn and drizzle on melted grass-fed organic butter. Most deliciously, I sprinkle sea salt all over the top.

Let me stop lying. It's more like I pour on the butter and the salt every one-inch tall increment of popcorn as it falls into the bowl. That's impressive, and it's a skill I've honed over several years. You have to stand at the ready, slowly spinning the bowl under the air popper with your left hand while gently drizzling on the butter from your right hand. Even coverage. Every time.

2014-09-24_butterNow I'll begin to unfold the secrets of my popcorn affair. Is it enough that my bedtime snack is free from pesticides, antibiotics, growth hormones, and genetic modification? We all know I'm not making toxic microwave popcorn. Sure, it clears the "no bad things" screening fairly easily, but, as I always ask when someone proudly shows me a "100 calorie" pack of cookies, "What is actually in there that's good for you?"

Over the past couple of years here at NUHS in the AOM program, I've horrified more than a couple of peers by describing my nighttime ritual. Although we naturally-minded medical people are generally all in agreement that whole-fat butter is better for your body than any margarine-like alternative, I've still heard the "too much fat for your liver to clean" argument against my nightly popcorn.

2014-09-24_bedSeveral months ago, I decided to give it a try. Who wants a Liver or Gall Bladder channel obstructed by phlegm? Not me. So I cut down my popcorn to once every week or two. It was rough. It was sad. I felt incomplete in some way when laying down for bed at night. My kidneys cried me to sleep, begging for the tonification that salt provides my deficient little nephron bodies. They went hungry, as did I.

After a few weeks of my new deprivation lifestyle, I realized something shocking -- I wasn't sleeping well! I've always been a good sleeper, falling right to sleep each night and sleeping straight through until the morning. Nine hours or so was the glorious norm for me. Not anymore. Suddenly it was a struggle to fall asleep and to stay asleep. Transient insomnia? Definitely. Chronic insomnia? I didn't want to head down that road.

Luckily, I happened to be taking Eric Baker's "Nutrition and Food Therapy of Oriental Medicine" course at this very time. I glanced down at my handout during class, and what did I see? Salty (a flavor in TCM, but most specifically manifested in actual SALT) collects the Shen. The Shen in TCM is basically the spirit or mind of the person.

2014-09-24_seasaltI had been neatly collecting my overscheduled, chaotic Shen before bed each night by some sort of inexplicable subconscious desire to put my mental pieces back together in order to sleep well. Now what was I doing? I was trying to fall asleep and stay asleep while my Shen gallivanted around my body and my life, scattered in tiny pieces into all of my hats -- mother, wife, student, professor, friend, sister, etc. No wonder I was failing every night.

Upon making the core connection between my salt, my shen, and my sleep, I promptly began my nightly (or nearly nightly) ritual of devouring a bowl of salty, buttery popcorn. What do you think happened? Let's just say I sleep nicely once again. My body was speaking to me, and I needed to listen. Pop on, popcorn!

I Want It Now

Over the past four weeks in my "Nutrition and Food Therapy of Oriental Medicine" course, I've been frustrated and slightly puzzled over the subject matter. I'm usually more a go-with-the-flow student in class; I'm sure the instructor knows what we need to cover and how to cover it. This time around, I still think he knows what we need to cover and how to lay it out, but I'm not as easy going about the whole thing for some reason.

Maybe it's because it's springtime, so my Liver wind is swirling and I'm irritable. Perhaps I'm overly critical because dietetics is my personal favorite element of oriental medicine. Maybe I'm just a jerk. I don't know. I want to study therapeutic properties of foods, and I want to right now!

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Let me start by saying how much I like this professor and every class I've had with him to date. The theory behind where we stick these needles and which herbal formulas we recommend is absolutely mind blowing. He taught me two years ago that winter has a color and a flavor -- black and salty, for the record. Yet each week, we seem to review the basics -- flavors and temperatures of substances. The course title indicates that the focus of the classwork will be nutrition and food therapy within the framework of oriental medicine, so I keep wanting more -- more detail, more examples, more ideas of how to alter a person's diet in order to improve health.

As we approach the famed Week Five Quiz that now makes an appearance in most classes, I'm starting to second-guess myself. Have we been just reviewing the basics of five-phase theory, or did the professor slip pages of new detail into the lectures when I wasn't looking? I'm sure he worked new information into the framework so smoothly that my associate learning didn't even know what was happening.

My frustration with this class is that I love the topic so much that I can't reach a satiation point. I will never have enough detail about food therapy to be content. I want more, I want it now, and I want to share it with everyone I know...and some people I don't even know yet.

2014-06-04_teaOnce again, springtime has duped me. I'm irritable, I'm impatient, and my Liver is out of control. Feel my pulse, second position on the left wrist. Can you say "wiry?"

As I do from time to time, I realize now it's time to reread the Dao de Jing, or the Tao Te Ching. Same book. Oh, pinyin, you are a beast that cannot be pinned down. The point is that this book, this short, easy to read, little book, can save your sanity. Whenever I feel overwhelmed, overstressed, over Livery in any way, I know it's time to pick it up.

Look at this thing. Lao Tzu, you genius!

"Those who know do not speak.
Those who speak do not know."

I, and just about everyone else, could learn a little something from that eloquent one-liner (two-liner?).

"Rushing into action, you fail. Trying to grasp things, you lose them.
Forcing a project to completion, you ruin what was almost ripe."

I don't even like poetry, but this stuff is literally masterful.

2014-06-04_wordsSo, why I am frustrated in Nutrition class? Why do I want to rush it? Why am I desperately grasping at the next piece of information? It's that "forcing a project to completion" part, that part I love for personal reasons. My procrastination has been vindicated!

As a professor, I often wait until the deadline to return students' papers; as a student, I expect my professors to grade my paper today! Actually, I don't think Lao Tzu would like that part.