Archive for tag: Chinese medicine

How to Use Chinese Herbs

Think it's too difficult for you? I think you're wrong. File this post away under the "if I can do it, you can do it" series. Unfortunately, this practical how-to post is the result of someone actually needing to use raw Chinese herbs to feel better--and that someone is me.

Remember that whole "damp-heat in the gall bladder" thing from a couple of weeks ago? Yep, me too. Turns out, I still have that going on. Yes, I self-diagnosed and self-treated in near silence. Did I say I was good at this? I'm sorry. No. I'm a student. I know close to nothing. In my defense, upon an actual visit to the NUHS AOM clinic to exercise my student-access-to-free-care privilege, I learned that I nailed my diagnosis and was only one off in my acupoints selection plan.

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Ingredients for Treatment

I was indeed on my way towards getting back to normal, but not quite there yet. No. What I needed was a boost -- a big powerful boost in the health direction. I needed herbs from Dr. Cai. After showing my tongue and displaying my pulsating wrists to the masses of interns, I left the clinic with my trusty sack of Chinese herbs. At Dr. Cai's request, I also needed to add in a slice of fresh ginger and three red dates with each batch, which I happened to have on hand.

Many people would peer into this bag thinking, "What the heck do I do with this pile of roots, bark, mushrooms, berries, and other unidentifiables? Technically, there could be geckos and cicada shells in there...shudder. In fact I refuse to look up everything in the formula shown on my receipt just in case therearegeckos and cicada shells in there.... So, here it is--your pictorial step-by-step guide to using raw Chinese herbs in a decoction. This is the instruction sheet that goes home with the patient.

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Instructions for Cooking Chinese Herbal Formula

What this is trying to say is dump one batch of the herbs into a pot, soak it, bring it to a boil, then simmer to reduce the liquid to a drinkable amount. Now, you'll want to find the perfect balance between "disgusting taste" and "effective dose," and that isnoteasy. You know you want to concentrate the liquid for potency, but you also know that you're increasing the taste by the same stroke.

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Before Cooking and After Cooking

Most herbal decoctions do not taste good. Face it. Most of us are damp. We eat dairy and fried foods (mmmm...fried dairy), and we end up with damp-heat. Thus, we need bitter herbs much of the time. Who's the lucky fella who gets a simple Spleen Qi deficiency diagnosis that results in a sweet licorice and berries formula to take home? Not this guy!

So, I soak my bitter herbs, I boil my bitter herbs, I simmer my bitter herbs. I drink my powerful decoction, and I go to sleep to let my body do its thing. I wake up a little better, and I know I have five more nights of chugging down my "bedtime tea" before my tongue can register just how gross it really tastes.

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"Bedtime Tea"

I could avoid much of the "hard work" in this process by requesting my herbs in granule form (like a dusty powder that you stir in warm water to dissolve). But then I'd lose a little potency. I could avoid all the work and the taste by requesting a patent pill formula, but then I'd lose even more potency. No thanks, weak sauce. I need the most full-strength option known to man -- ancient Chinese man, specifically. I need to decoct my raw herbs!

Is Chinese Medicine Better than Western Medicine?

Is Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) better than conventional western medicine? Would a provider of oriental medicine and one of the ayurvedic traditions treat a patient the same way? Do naturopaths diagnose the same medical conditions as chiropractors do? 

The answer to each of these questions is probably a solid "sometimes."

2014-02-04_booksThe point is that one medical system is not necessarily better than another. Each of the above-mentioned categories exist as an entire medical paradigm, complete with its own unique way of diagnosing and treating an array of health-related issues. Did you know that your chiropractor could give you a pelvic exam, ladies? Did you know that your naturopathic doctor could give you a spinal adjustment? And what about those herbs? Why do western naturopaths have a different materia medica than we students of oriental medicine do? Is slippery elm awesome? I'll never know. And neither did the ancient Chinese, because it didn't grow there.

We've all heard that there is competition between the students, all graduating in Lombard at the same moment, as they get dumped out into a market that becomes more and more saturated every day. We all feel it from time to time -- a student of acupuncture who assumes her classes are 10,000 times more difficult than that of the massage student down the hall; the chiropractic intern who thinks he's way more important than any acupuncturist in the clinic; or the naturopath who points out that she can do everything a chiropractor can do and more!

Are they all right? Or are we all just egotistical jerks? Again, the answer is an unreassuring "sometimes."

2014-02-04_elmWhat I'm learning at NUHS is the unmistakable value of the various medical systems. My friends ask me if I scrape my tongue daily or if I've dabbled in oil pulling. No and no, I tell them. That's from the ayurvedic traditions of India, not the ancient Chinese medicine that I'm studying. Does that mean I don't think these practices have merit? Nope. I'm sure they do...I'm just not learning about them in my program. I've actually tried oil pulling, but I'm fairly certain I did it wrong, and I swallowed, which I learned later defeats the point. Whoops. I also love essential oils, and I frankly have no idea which tradition claims them.

What are we learning in the MS in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program at NUHS? I've memorized hundreds of acupoints -- well, a good chunk of them anyways -- and dozens of Chinese herbs, I finally realized that ginger and garlic are making it worse when I have a heat invasion, and I'm piecing together why a point on my inner wrist is so helpful for my heart palpitations. I finally learned how to spell "ayurvedic," and I hope I can pronounce "naturopathy" correctly most of the time these days.

2014-02-04_herbsMore importantly, I'm also learning that the "competition" chatter has a much bigger bark than bite. We students of oriental medicine like you students of chiropractic, naturopathy, and massage therapy, and I feel fairly confident assuming that you guys like us, too. In fact, the sheer number of students who dual enroll in more than one program at NUHS proves this point for me.

I value what the other practices and traditions bring to the overall health and well-being of the patient. I don't expect that I'll offer a patient the same knowledge and services that an ND or an MD does; I'll offer them something almost entirely different in fact. And that, my friends, is the point. We have a better shot at helping people if we work together, value each other's contributions and specialties, and keep an open mind to things that might sound crazy at first. Energy crystals...what?!

I See Tongues

Tongue DiagramIt's already second nature. When I see people, I see tongues. I notice when the actor in the movie on the big screen has a thick white coat. I try to sneak a peek at my friends' tongues when we're having a casual conversation. If there's a thick yellow coat, I subconsciously take a step back and continue our conversation from a safer distance. I've actually had dreams about analyzing someone's tongue shape, size, color, and coat.

Why am I haunted by tongues? As a student of acupuncture and oriental medicine, I've taken classes on how to evaluate various tongue appearances and use that valuable, albeit gross, information when formulating a diagnosis about the patient's overall condition. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the tongue and pulse are integral pieces in the puzzle of health and wellness.

The 2,000 year-old classic "Huang Di Nei Jing", translated as "The Yellow Emperor's Inner Cannon," offers around 60 quotes about the tongue. We are instructed to examine the exterior, including the orifices, in order to gain a clear picture of the interior. Specifically, the tongue can reveal problematic areas or functional systems within the body, such as stagnated Liver Qi or an accumulation of dampness. Not everyone in oriental medicine relies on the "stick out your tongue" method when diagnosing patients, though. Different practitioners place a varying amount of importance on the tongue's appearance. One professor even told us to treat the tongue appearance as a "tie breaker" if you are wavering between two diagnoses.

As a result, we students study the tongue diligently, searching for heat prickles, digging for signs of sublingual dilation. If we see a thick tongue with a white coat and scalloped edges, we feel fairly confident suggesting that the patient suffers from Spleen Qi deficiency. If you see a purple tongue with ventral dilation that gives you nightmares of giant black caterpillars crawling towards you, then you check into the patient's Liver Qi stagnation issues. Unfortunately, what you see in the average person's mouth is a combination of every diagnosable characteristic you've ever learned. In other words, it's not as easy as it sounds!

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I'll leave you with this tongue conversation that I had today with my 3-year-old son. Yes, even toddlers are getting in on the trend of diagnosing tongues these days! Enjoy...

Me: Let me see your tongue, buddy. (I look at the normal beautiful tongue that only children seem to have.) Thanks, it looks pretty good!

Him: Thanks, Mom. Show me your tongue now. (I stick out the mess that we adults always seem to have.) Whoa! Yours looks bad. It looks like a pirate ship... with windows... and people... and a volcano... and some beds! 

Go ahead...check out some tongue info here: http://www.sacredlotus.com/diagnosis/tongue/