Explore Careers through Student Organizations

A great aspect of earning a bachelor's degree in biomedical science at National University is that you can join or attend meetings of our student organizations, even those that are geared to professional degree students. Why is that a plus? Because sampling our student organizations will give you first hand exposure to topics in a variety of health care fields.

For example, as a BS student you can join the Homeopathy Club and learn more about homeopathic medicine for both yourself, and how physicians apply it for patient care. Or learn more about acupuncture and oriental medicine by hearing noted speakers hosted by our Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Club.

Other great clubs on campus that let you explore future career specializations are the Sports Rehab Club, Public Health Club, research oriented Journal Clubs, or our professional clubs such as the Student American Chiropractic Association, or Naturopathic Medical Student Association.

Photo of students playing volleyball on campus
Students playing volleyball and basketball on campus

Clubs are a great way to meet other students and get active on campus. There are also recreational clubs such as the Running /Walking Club, the Yoga Club, or the Basketball Club. You can meet and network with graduate students who, just like you, are excited about science and health care.

At National University, there's more to college than just great classroom learning! Explore more about NUHS at one of our student for a day events.

The Future Looks Bright for STEM Bachelor Degrees

Have you heard the buzz-phrase "STEM" career or "STEM" education? STEM stands for Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics, and it's become an important acronym for employers, educators and policy makers nationwide. This is because the demand for professionals trained in science, technology, engineering and math keeps growing.

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What are some of the facts about STEM degrees and STEM careers? In 2011, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce did a workforce study focused on STEM education and workforce issues. Here's what the report found:

  • Workers with associate's degrees in STEM fields out-earn 63 percent of people who have bachelor's degrees in other fields.
  • Almost half of workers with bachelor's degrees in STEM fields out-earn workers with PhDs in other fields
  • Regardless of occupation, people with a bachelor's degree in a STEM major make roughly $500,000 more over their lifetimes than non-STEM majors.
  • Over the past 30 years, salaries in STEM-related jobs have jumped faster than those in any other occupation other than healthcare professionals and managerial occupations.
  • STEM wages jumped 31 percent over the past 30 years, compared with 23 percent for all non-STEM occupations.

What does this mean for you? It means that finishing your bachelor's degree in biomedical science at National University may be a very smart decision in building a successful and rewarding career. Learn more by planning to attend one of our student-for-a-day events.

Invest a Day Toward Your Future

If you are strongly considering finishing your bachelor's degree in biomedical science, here's a day you won't want to miss: Saturday, March 1, 2014!

Twice a year, National University of Health Sciences hosts a Campus Visit Day that's fun, interactive and packed full of information on its fantastic BS program. March 1st is the next one, and it's coming up quick.

You'll start the day with a continental breakfast, then enjoy a program overview, campus tour, a chance to meet current and former students, and learn the nitty-gritty about financial aid, admissions, housing and more.  Then you'll enjoy lunch and a chance to meet some of the student clubs, faculty and staff on campus.

Furthermore, NUHS offers a special tuition incentive for everyone who attends Campus Visit Day.  If you attend the event, and then choose to enroll in the NUHS Bachelor of Biomedical Science program, you'll receive a $250 tuition credit for your first trimester.

How to Register

To hold your place for Campus Visit Day, register online, or call 1-800-826-6285

A confirmation packet will be mailed to you with directions and a schedule of the day's events.

For questions or more information, contact the Office of Admissions at 1-800-826-6285 or admissions@nuhs.edu

Online Resources for Science Careers from Science Magazine

The journal Science, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), has an online news center with a special science career section.

Here you'll find a collection of recent stories on careers in science from a variety of news publications. There's also a lively science career discussion forum where science students, academics, employers and current scientists give each other tips on navigating their career paths.

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There's also a job search tool to look through an updated listing of current science employment opportunities. For example, we put the term "research" into the search engine and pulled up 1289 job listings in scientific research from around the world. There's also a library of employer profiles, so that you can get to know some of the larger employers in the science industry.

You can even open an account on the site, post your resume, and get up-to-date job openings emailed to you. Your account allows you to make your resume and profile available to headhunters and employers in the science industry.

This site will help you imagine all the opportunities you'll be able to explore with your bachelor's degree in biomedical science from National University.

Real Cadavers in Undergrad? You Bet!

When you study Anatomy I and II at National University of Health Sciences, you'll work with pre-dissected cadavers in the graduate level gross anatomy laboratory.

"Our bachelor of science students enrolled in anatomy courses spend two hours each week in the lab.  During that time, they examine multiple cadavers to observe structures that they are discussing in classroom lectures, and to observe differences between one body and another," says Dr. Randy Swenson, dean of the NUHS College of Allied Health Sciences.

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The instructor and an assistant are on hand to help students work with the cadavers, and are available to answer questions.  In addition, the lab is equipped with a smart board, camera and digital monitors, so the instructor can share a cadaver observation with the entire class.

Most other undergraduate anatomy programs combine the study of anatomy with physiology in a standard "A&P" course.  Some schools may offer only one course in anatomy that covers the entire body. NUHS is unique in that it offers not only one, but two highly detailed courses in anatomy: Anatomy l, covering the musculoskeletal systems, muscles, bones, nerves, blood vessels, and skin; Anatomy II covering the chest and abdomen, lungs, heart, gastro-intestinal tract, and reproductive system.

"The human anatomy lab is one of the reasons I moved here from Canada to finish my bachelor's degree at NUHS," says Reza Danesh, who is working toward a career as a DO or MD in the future.

"We go to a much higher level of detail than most community or four-year colleges. Our format provides much better preparation for students who are preparing for medical school and professional health degree programs," says Dr. Swenson.

National University recently renovated its anatomy lab, bringing in state of the art technology and new equipment. ( Read more about the NUHS anatomy lab.)