Archive for tag: biomedical science

The Future Looks Bright for STEM Bachelor Degrees

Have you heard the buzz-phrase "STEM" career or "STEM" education? STEM stands for Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics, and it's become an important acronym for employers, educators and policy makers nationwide. This is because the demand for professionals trained in science, technology, engineering and math keeps growing.

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What are some of the facts about STEM degrees and STEM careers? In 2011, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce did a workforce study focused on STEM education and workforce issues. Here's what the report found:

  • Workers with associate's degrees in STEM fields out-earn 63 percent of people who have bachelor's degrees in other fields.
  • Almost half of workers with bachelor's degrees in STEM fields out-earn workers with PhDs in other fields
  • Regardless of occupation, people with a bachelor's degree in a STEM major make roughly $500,000 more over their lifetimes than non-STEM majors.
  • Over the past 30 years, salaries in STEM-related jobs have jumped faster than those in any other occupation other than healthcare professionals and managerial occupations.
  • STEM wages jumped 31 percent over the past 30 years, compared with 23 percent for all non-STEM occupations.

What does this mean for you? It means that finishing your bachelor's degree in biomedical science at National University may be a very smart decision in building a successful and rewarding career. Learn more by planning to attend one of our student-for-a-day events.

BS Program at NUHS Gives Students an Edge

In this video, student Greg Swets explains why National University's  bachelor degree completion program in biomedical science has the edge over similar programs at other schools. Top instructors and a graduate level environment are big reasons. Greg plans to use his bachelor's degree as a stepping stone toward a career as a chiropractic and naturopathic physician.
 

Career Information and Student Resources

Are you still wondering what you can do with a bachelor's degree in biomedical science? Check out the American Institute of Biological Sciences' website.  You'll find helpful career information, even a career brochure for what you can do with a biology degree.

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The AIBS is a nonprofit scientific association dedicated to advancing biological research and education for the welfare of society.  They are a resource for Congress when legislative decisions have a biological science component. They also have an informative website called Action Bioscience that keeps the public up to date on biological science issues affecting our world and affecting public policy.

Would you like to network with other students in the biological sciences? You can join the AIBS Facebook group for students in biology. 

AIBS is yet another organization echoing what National University has said all along: Career prospects in the biomedical and biological sciences are growing and can be found in a diverse range of industries.

 

Exploring an Emphasis in Nutrition for a BS Degree

One great feature of the bachelor's degree completion program here at NUHS, is the option to choose an "emphasis in nutrition." Many students are choosing this, as it's a great complement to a B.S. in Biomedical Science. 

We decided to talk with one of NUHS' favorite professors, who is the nutrition "guru" here at NUHS. Dr. Daniel Richardson is the assistant dean for the College of Allied Health Sciences, and holds bachelors, masters and PhD degrees from Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Pharmacology and Pharmocognosy. He is a Diplomate in the American Association of Nutrition Consultants as well as a Certified Nutrition Consultant. (Yes, that's the caliber of our undergraduate faculty here!)

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"There is a growing interest in nutrition in our country, and people are taking charge of their own health through better nutrition," he says. "Most medicine is based largely on the body's ability to heal itself, but that can only happen if the patient has the right amount of nutrients."

For a student hoping to become a naturopathic physician some day, Dr. Richardson made it clear that you don't have to become a nutritionist to benefit from an education in nutrition. He explains that, "Whatever type of health professional you plan to be, be it a chiropractic or naturopathic physician, dentist, an M.D., an optometrist, or a nurse, a solid knowledge of nutrition will help you make better diagnoses and provide better care for your patients."

The great part about choosing this emphasis is that when you graduate, it's reflected on your NUHS diploma. To do an emphasis in nutrition means you can't just take any courses you want, like the regular BS degree. You need to have 19 hours of credit in nutrition courses such as:

  • Sports and Physical Performance Nutrition
  • Nutrition in the Life Cycle
  • Nutrition in Health and Disease
  • Food Science
  • Plus other nutritional courses!

An "emphasis" is like an added credential or a sub-major within biomedical science. Dr. Richardson reports that the university hopes to develop other areas of emphasis in the future.