Archive for tag: tri 8

Going, Going...

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

                               -- Dylan Thomas

Boy, did the end of this tri sneak up on me. I'm not kidding. I looked up and it was Week 13 and I had to start scrambling to get everything done. Now, here we are in Week 14 and the scrambling continues. It's the end of Tri 8. The End. Of Tri 8. These are the last finals that I have to take for this program. We're all to the point where we're fed up, tired, and so over all of the projects and papers and quizzes and exams and practicals. I've heard talk from a few people about giving up. I really have. It's not out of the realm of comprehension to just throw your hands up in the air, take a different path, and just go quietly into the night. But we won't, because we've come too far and done too much work. We can't quit now. It's just not an option.

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In Doctor-Patient Relationship class today, we were talking about lobbying, the ACA, the ACC, and a few other organizations. We were talking, not just about what we're doing here, but what we're hoping to accomplish -- the bigger picture. We've been tasked with writing down where we want to be in 5 years -- not just what we want to be doing professionally, but personally. I can't imagine what life will be like in 5 years -- where I'll be, what I'll be doing. It seems so far away, and yet I know time will fly (just like this Tri did). I wonder if the face of medicine will change -- whether our scope will change across the board, whether we'll have prescribing rights in more states, or whether we'll continue to be segregated like we have been. A lot can change in 5 years -- 5 years ago my life looked dramatically different. I never thought I'd be where I am now, doing what I'm doing. It's pretty amazing how things can change.

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I know, though, what I'll be doing for the next 9 days: studying. So with that in mind, I'll keep this brief and to the point. Study hard, boys and girls. Get your work done; finish your projects. Check the check boxes and fill in those dots. Share some gratitude and compassion with your classmates and even your instructors. This is the last time we go down this Path.

2014-08-07-gulf1

As a "going away" for this Tri, I found another little park tucked back somewhere in Gulfport while Grey and I were driving around. Photos in this post courtesy of Grey.

Good luck on exams everyone. Have an amazing and restful break.

Happy Summer, Everybody!

Summer is in full swing here (not that it hasn't been for several months). The temperatures are consistently over 90; the daily Florida rainstorms are happening; and we're expecting our first Tropical Storm/Hurricane tomorrow. By the way, I'm not even remotely worried.

White Coat Ceremony

I had the great joy of being a part of the White Coat Ceremony for the 1st Trimester students. It's such a different experience to be on the opposite side of the stage. As an 8th trimester student, I'm looking at this from the other side of Basic Sciences, Phase 2 Clinical Sciences, and the first round of boards. I know that I didn't have any idea what was in store for me when I was on that stage. I was nervous, excited, and scared. I didn't know how hard of a road it was going to be, how much I would learn, and what challenges I would face. If I could give one piece of advice to incoming students and students in the early tris, it would be this: be dedicated; be tenacious; but be kind to yourself. This is a long, hard road--but all the stress, work, and pain is worth it.

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Educating the Uneducated

I want to revisit a topic that I've touched on before: education about the profession. Misconceptions about chiropractic, our education, and what we do run rampant in society. Just yesterday, I received a graphic on Facebook from a very popular site that listed us as "Quacks." They've published similar graphics/articles before. I'm not going to name them, because I don't want to endorse; that's not the point here. There is still the misconception out there, that we're all trying to alter "the force," and that by believing the body has the ability to heal itself, we're a bunch of lunatics. A large portion of the public believes that we only associate well-being with the spine, and that we only treat the spine. They're uneducated about how extensive our training in physiology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, biochemistry, and nutrition (to name a few) actually is. They don't know that many of us are evidence-based, research-oriented, internal medicine-focused students and practitioners.

This is a call to arms, my friends and colleagues. We have to change this; right now. Chances are that if your friends and family have kept touch with you during your educational escapades, that they're familiar with what you're doing, and probably support you. For those reading the blog that aren't students (or prospective students), chances are you're reading this blog because you support the institution or someone involved in it. So I realize, by saying all of this, that I'm preaching to the choir. But what about everybody else? What about the people we meet on the street? What about our Facebook friends that live far and wide? What about all of the misconceptions floating around about who we are and what we do?

The American Chiropractic Association lobbies in Washington for chiropractic legislation, but we don't have a cohesive organization that handles education of the public. We are it. We are the educators.

I'm going to challenge each and every one of you, to go out there and share what you do, what your training is, how our education is different, and how we are making a difference in health and well-being. For those that are supporters of the field, I thank you for that. I'm going to challenge you as well, to share your knowledge and experience of the field of chiropractic with those around you. Let them know how we're making a difference.

Have a great week everybody, and a safe and happy 4th of July.

Another Week, Another Blog Posting

How are everyone's midterms going? I'm on break from the master's program. I had finals last week. I'm glad to have a couple of weeks off to catch up on a few things, including all the reading that I didn't get done during the quarter. My pile is still astronomically large. We'll see how much I can get done. I figure if I don't get it done before classes start there again, it's probably a lost cause.

Last weekend, my friend and classmate Julia, went to homecoming at the main campus in Lombard. I want to say, to everyone there in Lombard, thanks for taking such great care of her! She had glowing remarks for everyone that she met. There were meetings and events, information sessions, etc. She was able to meet Dr. James Cox (of Cox flexion-distraction fame), and many of our illustrious alumni.

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Dr. Strauss and Florida students with Dr. Cox at Homecoming

Julia was able to reassure us students about one of the issues that we find frustrating. We are always hearing that we'll not be able to find jobs or make a decent salary. Even though I've yet to meet anyone at school that's "in it for the money," we're all hoping that we'll be able to make enough to at least pay back our student loans, and maybe have enough for food. Even speakers that have come to the school (non-alumni) have commented that it would be tough for us to make a living.

The problem is, with all of my research, and all of the alums that I've spoken to and heard from indirectly, this is FAR from the case. Julia confirmed this when she spoke with alumni at homecoming. She said that everyone that was doing VERY well for themselves. People were not only successful and able to pay back their loans, but also contribute back to the school. It was inspirational for her that not only would we be out and in the community, but thriving. I'm glad she shared that with me, because I needed the inspiration as well.

We're finally starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel. It's halfway through 8th Tri. In a few months, we'll only be in the clinic. No more classes. No more random exams. No more quizzes, papers, or random presentations. It's been REALLY easy to lose track of time this tri. Alarmingly easy. I've been caught up with patients, in my own stuff, with the master's, and classes. I honestly can't wait for classes to be over.

I was asked today how I liked clinic. I've said this before, and I'll say it again -- I love it. I love the idea of being able to do this every day. Even with the challenging cases (my favorites), the idea of being challenged to learn all the time is exciting. I never know what I'm walking into, and I find that absolutely enthralling. I can't imagine any kind of job, ever, that would be anything like this. When I'm in clinic working, I am more than pleased with my choice.

Have a great week everybody!

We Made It - Week 14

We made it! Well, almost. It's week 14 -- which means there's only one week left. This week and next week are finals. This week is mostly practical finals, but I have a few written as well. Acupuncture, the practical, was over the weekend. We also had the clinical entrance exam for physical therapeutics. We have to pass that exam, in order to progress to the clinic and treat (using those modalities). We were all pretty nervous -- because we're all anxious to get to clinic.

After next week, I'll be in Tri 8. Tri 8. (did you hear that sang angelically and see the beams of sunlight streaming down onto those two words?). They did. We've been talking about schedules and who will take what shift -- and how nervous some of us are. I'm not nervous -- at least that's what I'm telling everyone. I'm anxious to see what all we'll end up doing. What most people don't know is that any of the St Pete College and NUHS students can come to our clinic for free (and their immediate family too). We're really hoping that we see a lot of people -- that need all kinds of help. We do more than MSK -- just to let you know. I'm really hoping to get some functional medicine and nutrition patients as well.

2014-04-11_beach

So, after the "festivities" of the next 2 weeks, we have break. Break (did you hear the angels again?). This will be the first break that I've actually had since Fall of 2012 -- not because we didn't have a break, but because I was so busy. I worked, moved, studied for boards, worked -- and now, I finally get a break. I'm so excited! What will I do? I am going to a festival, the first weekend of break -- and I'm really looking forward to it. I haven't been to one here in about 4 years. I'll be volunteering as a Medic (only requires CPR certification), and I always have an amazing time. I also still have Master's work to do (which starts back this week), and random stuff around the house -- projects, prospects, and purpose. I'm trying to stay focused on finals and studying, but the allure of "free time" is haunting the back of my mind.

So, I figured you all needed to see something new around the area, so I went to Gulfport. I don't know why I haven't taken you all to Gulfport before -- it's only a hop, skip, and a jump from my house. While most people spend their nightlife in Ybor in Tampa or in Downtown St Pete, I tend to go to Gulfport. My favorite karaoke bar (O'Maddy's) is there -- where on random weekend nights I might be found singing Pink, Bonnie Raitt, or Evanescence. Really, Downtown Gulfport feels like a really small town right on the beach. There are some little shops, open air bars/restaurants, and a beach. It reminds me of the little beach towns in movies from the 50's and 60's.

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Gulfport Casino

So, featured in the pictures today is the Gulfport Casino -- right at the center of Downtown Gulfport. Here's some history about it: Then And Now: The Gulfport Casino Ballroom. The Casino, as it stands now, was built in 1934 -- and architecturally it fits into the time -- beach-Craftsman era. They host all kinds of events there now -- including ballroom dancing. If you're in town -- before or after you come by the school, I recommend stopping by. And if you see me at karaoke, I might even sing you a song. I know that I'll be spending some time there over break. I'm really looking forward to it.

So, I'll see you guys after break. Good luck on finals. Enjoy the time. Next Tri means big, big things.