Archive for tag: sickness

Patients and Patience

You're not behind the desk, you're sitting in the chair next to it. Waiting. Waiting, for what seems like FOREVER for them to come look at you, examine you, swab, cut, bleed, sample, whatever you. They're taking forever. You feel wretched. Everything aches, stings, hurts. You're tired from staying up all night worrying, hurting, stressing. You only want to know what's going on and you feel like you're simply the only person on the face of the planet, and no one is able or willing to help you.

I'm trying to explain what it feels like to be sick -- to be frustrated with the status of the medical profession and confused and angry and scared. I'm trying to explain what it feels like, no matter how melodramatic it may be, to feel like someone else has control over your health, what's wrong, and if and when you'll get better. There's a feeling of being completely helpless that comes with being sick -- when there's pain, when there's no observable pattern or relatively easy diagnosis, or when it just seems to drag on forever. It's a feeling that no one seems to understand -- like being held hostage by something or someone and being powerless to do anything about it. And it doesn't go away -- that feeling -- until there's some grasp over the problem, like some answer, lab result, diagnosis, something, ANYTHING that seems to give some control over the situation.

If you, as a person, have never felt this way, count yourself lucky. But many others can't say that. Our patients likely can't say that. They come to us hoping for understanding and compassion, and the willingness and ability to find out what's wrong. I only hope that they find it.

It's hard to be the patient when you're used to being the physician. It's also hard to be a physician when you've never been a patient. William Hurt, in a 1991 movie called "The Doctor" illustrated just this. Having been an important, influential physician, he finds himself with cancer -- and realizes just how horrible of a physician (no matter how skilled) he (and some of his colleagues) could be.

People come to us in their worst conditions. They're not always in a good mood. They're not always understanding of our limitations as physicians (or students). They come to us seeking help and advice -- and of course, our expertise. Finding answers is what we're supposed to do. It's what our training is based in and what we've been working towards for our academic/professional careers.

But all of that training only provides a fraction of what our patients need from us. They need our compassion and understanding. This isn't taught in school. It comes from within, and unfortunately, it comes from experience.

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(Image source: hopeinhealingblog.wordpress.com)

For some of us, it's been sickness that has made us this way -- or abuse, or poverty, or just LIFE. For others, it's those things that are in the process of making them that way.

Be kind to each other this week, Everybody. Have a great one.