Archive for tag: science

Life's Kaleidoscope

The trimester is coming to a close, and I can honestly say it's flown by. We're all scrambling to meet deadlines in the clinic: this many of this, that many of that. It hardly seems that about 12 weeks ago we were terrified we'd be horrible at this. Truth be told, I didn't think anything about deadlines and numbers and paperwork (OK, well I did think about paperwork a little bit). That's probably why I'm scrambling now.

The last couple of weeks have been discussions about who is transitioning to the other clinic, and some talks about where we'll end up. Half of our crew is moving to the other clinic. It's unlikely that I'll see them very often. Perhaps we'll have seminars or training sessions of some sort, or get together outside of school (although we don't do that now). But in a few weeks, there will be another big transition for all of us. Some of us have been together, nearly every day, for about 3 years. This will be something really new.

Newness. It reminds me of my theory about Maslow's Hierarchy from last week. Incidentally, I've been working some more on that, but I'll spare you all the details. I had the pleasure to discuss it with two of my fellow interns today, the concept of new ideas. We were talking about my theory, and about other theories -- things in medicine and science that seem to have been left behind. We were discussing the idea that there are no new ideas.

Gift_kaleidoscope_sparkling_flower_by_mladavid
Image by http://mladavid.deviantart.com

Mark Twain said:

"There is no such thing as a new idea. It is impossible. We simply take a lot of old ideas and put them into a sort of mental kaleidoscope. We give them a turn and they make new and curious combinations. We keep on turning and making new combinations indefinitely, but they are the same old pieces of colored glass that have been in use through all the ages."

I grew up not far from good ol' Mark Twain's stomping grounds, but between you and me, his writing always made me crazy. No matter how much I tried, I couldn't understand the dialect he wrote. I'm not sure that I agree with Mark; it seems we're discovering new things all the time. From god particles to medicines, we strive and learn how to change, adapt, and understand the world around us.

If the last 12 weeks in the clinic have taught me anything, it's that we have no standard approach to treating anything. We have to be willing to come up with new ideas, or at the very least, new applications for old ideas. For every patient that comes in, even if they have the "same" diagnosis, what works for each one of them is likely to be something completely different.

I'm fairly certain that our discussion today came to the conclusion that there has to be something new. There has to be a pursuit of Science that crosses boundaries into new territories, that bypasses the need for a randomized controlled trial of everything, and simply embraces discovery for the sake of discovery, and implementation for the benefit of the whole. Perhaps we're all idealists. I see no problem with that. Being idealistic just promotes my love of the field and my hope for making a difference.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, in his series "Cosmos" said:

"To make this journey, we'll need imagination, but imagination alone is not enough because the reality of nature is far more wondrous than anything we can imagine."

OK, Neil. I'll take that one to heart. The greatest theories come from crazy idealists.

I wish you all many great new discoveries. May your kaleidoscope always look just a little bit different.