Living Gluten Free

On Easter, this year, while everybody's eating their dark chocolate Paleo-friendly bunnies (I like to bite the ears off first), I'll be celebrating 15 years of being gluten-free. It's hard to believe. "Back in the day", things were a whole lot different than they are now. It seemed that few people had celiac (or were gluten-free) or knew anything about it--including the professionals. The testing was different--biopsy and IgG anti-gliadin or anti-endomysial blood tests. The pre-made food was a lot harder to find (and surprisingly less expensive) and the education of the medical community was nearly non-existent. My how things have changed! There are sensitive and specific blood tests now (tissue trans-glutaminase), everything seems to have a gluten-free label on it, and docs--especially those in our profession, seem to know more and more about the benefits of going gluten-free.

My household has been gluten-free--exclusively--for the last 5 years. It's so important that the whole house be in support of the diet. For me, it was a no-brainer. Both Grey and I are Celiac, and Forest has never purposely had gluten. All the support groups stress how important it is to avoid contamination (and NOT cheat!). In order for a product to be considered gluten-free, it has to have less than 200 ppm of gluten.

For Celiacs, even small/accidental exposures are dangerous. People might not have an overt reaction to contamination amounts, but they might still cause sub-clinical symptoms--flattened villi, malabsorption, deficiencies, and constant damage to the GALT--leading to lymphoma and GI cancers. Yikes, right?! These small amounts can remain in cooking utensils, porous cooking pans, and shared equipment. So, after a major move and shift within the family, we started over with new utensils, new pots and pans, and a completely clean house. Other than the occasional poison-carrying visitor and the cats (whose food smell reminds me of wheat bread toast), we don't even allow lickable envelopes (Did you know that glue contains wheat?).

I can't begin to say how much of a difference going gluten-free has made in my life. Besides feeling infinitely better, I've experienced a number of benefits--from clearer thinking to better skin and hair (and most importantly, a happier gut!). For Grey, the benefits were a lot more dramatic. He was born at the 95th percentile, and before being diagnosed, dropped to less than 5th percentile. Of course, that was a long time ago--and now he's bigger than I am! 

I've been asked if I'd endorse a gluten-free diet. I absolutely would. I'm not so sure that I'd endorse all the pre-packaged foods being sold on store shelves right now. Processing is pretty much always bad. But, with all the research that's coming out about lectins, gliadin, and grains, it's making more and more sense for pretty much everyone to be gluten-free. So, I'll leave all of you with this: Educate yourselves about what you CAN put into your body--and what effects it might have. If you're not doing it for yourselves, do so for your patients. Remember that not all cases are textbook (in fact most cases of Celiac aren't). If you need help, feel free to contact me. And for some other resources, check these out:

And one last thing: I'll leave you with some "crack" containing, non-Paleo, yet gluten-free yummies--just in case you're going gluten-free and missing something sweet. (Don't hate me, Dr. S.!) 

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These are gluten-free, can be made egg-free and dairy-free, are vegetarian (but not vegan) and are most definitely NOT sugar-free. 

Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies 

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 350º F.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup cane sugar (not white - turbinado or dehydrated cane is best)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 egg replacer (1 Tbsp. egg replacer powder with 3 Tbsp water - or sub 1 egg)
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla (I make LIBERAL use of vanilla - DO NOT use imitation vanilla)

Instructions

  • Mix this stuff together with the mixer.
  • Add in the following:
    • 1-1/2 cups gluten-free flour mix (6 parts rice flour : 2 parts potato starch : 1 part tapioca starch) (Keep some extra just in case you need to stiffen up the dough.)
    • 1/2 tsp. baking powder
    • 1 cup (or more) chocolate chips (I like Ghirardelli mini semi-sweets mixed with their 60% cacao)
  • Bake for about 12 minutes per pan.

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No baking adventure is complete without flour all over the kitchen LOL. Please do your part to continue the tradition.

Next Food Adventure: Converting gluten-free to Paleo. I accept this challenge.

Have a GREAT week everybody!